Revised Draft Research Paper

Revised Draft Research Paper - The Causes and Effects of...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–4. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
The Causes and Effects of Addiction It is tough to see a family member fall into the world of drug addictions because more than half of the people arrested in the United States have illegal drugs in their system (“Drug Related Crime”, Sec. 1). Drugs are often thought of as dangerous substances that only addicts will abuse to feed their addiction. However, drugs can include a range of different molecules that all affect biological processes. Every drug affects the user in a different way, changing the way nerve cells normally send, receive, and process information. Most abused drugs are those that cause mood-altering effects on the user such as stimulants, depressants, and hallucinogens. Scientists are studying the ways that drugs interfere with the normal processes of the brain, the causes of addiction, the prevention of drug abuse, and how this can lead to long-term side effects. The future of drug dependence will change forever when a new type of prescription
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Hugs Not Drugs 2 medications is released that can return the chemical balance in the brain to pre- addictive levels. The brain is genetically programmed to reward itself when presented with pleasurable stimuli such as food, sex, or drugs (Simpson, Sec. 2). This rewarding feeling is provided when the brain becomes flooded with dopamine. Nora D. Volkow of the National Institute on Drug Abuse explains, “Dopamine is a neurotransmitter present in regions of the brain that regulate movement, emotion, cognition, motivation, and feelings of pleasure. The overstimulation of this system, which rewards our natural behaviors, produces the euphoric effects sought by people who abuse drugs and teaches them to repeat the behavior” (sec. 5). This being said, the brain can be taught to become addicted to anything from sugar to music. All drugs of abuse interact with this neurotransmitter and a few others to produce their euphoric and mood-changing effects. Origins of Abuse According to Mayo Clinic, “Most drug addictions start with casual or social use of a drug. For some people, using the drug becomes a habit, and its use becomes more and more frequent. As time passes, (the user) may need larger doses of the drug to get high” (sec. 2). This may not come as a surprise but it’s true that what starts off as fun and games can lead to more serious consequences like addiction. The most common age for drug experimentation to begin is teenage years when the brain is or apt to react on impulse because teenager’s prefrontal cortex, the planning/personality area of the brain, has not fully developed (sec. 2). Teenager’s are therefore most likely to experiment with drugs without taking into account the repercussions. Often times the abused drugs are prescription and can easily be found in many family households (see
Background image of page 2
Hugs Not Drugs 3 Fig.1). Like many psychological disorders, drug addiction and dependence depends on two main factors, environment and genes (sec. 3). Environment factors such as peer pressure and lack of family involvement can play a key role in initial drug use. Genetics
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Image of page 4
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

Page1 / 12

Revised Draft Research Paper - The Causes and Effects of...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 4. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online