Oedipus Rex

Oedipus Rex - Allison Taylor History 20 Leslie Waters Student ID 803-577-009 Fate Free Will in Oedipus Rex Oedipus Rex is a classic Greek tragedy

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Allison Taylor History 20- Leslie Waters Student ID: 803-577-009 “Oedipus Rex” is a classic Greek tragedy written by the great Sophocles in the fifth century BCE. Much of the myth of Oedipus took place long before the opening scene of the play. King Laius learned from an oracle that he was, “doomed to perish by the hands of his own son.” Frightened that his son was going to try and kill him, he binds Oedipus’ ankles and takes him to a shepherd of whom he orders to kill the infant. Instead of following these brutal commands, the shepherd takes the child and abandons him in the fields. He thought that leaving the child’s fate “up to the gods” would be more beneficial and humane. Oedipus was picked up and taken to the King of Corinth, King Polybus, who had no children. King Polybus and his wife Merope raised the child as their own never telling Oedipus the truth of his past. This plan worked out until Oedipus heard a rumor that Polybus and Merope might not be his biological parents. When asked about it, they denied it. Still curious and doubtful Oedipus asks the Delphic Oracle who his parents really are. The only information that came of the encounter was that fate had him predestined to "Mate with his own mother, and shed with his own hands the
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This note was uploaded on 02/15/2012 for the course HISTORY 20 taught by Professor Professorruiz during the Spring '11 term at UCLA.

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Oedipus Rex - Allison Taylor History 20 Leslie Waters Student ID 803-577-009 Fate Free Will in Oedipus Rex Oedipus Rex is a classic Greek tragedy

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