Lecture 4

Lecture 4 - Channel Setting Instructions for ResponseCard...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–12. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Channel Setting Instructions for ResponseCard RF 1. Press and release the "GO" button. 2. While the light is flashing red and green, enter the 2 digit channel code (i.e. channel 1 = 01, channel 21 = 21). Set to Channel 44 by pressing “4”, then “4” 3. After the second digit is entered, Press and release the "GO" button. 4. Press and release the "1/A" button. The light should flash yellow to confirm.
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Lecture 4 Organizing Cells I - Proteins: Structure and Function Ch. 4 pp.119-149
Background image of page 2
Proteins I - Structure and Functions - Ch. 4 1. Roles of proteins in cells 2. Forces determining structure 3. Alpha Helices, Beta Sheets and Disulfides are core elements of the Secondary Structures of proteins - Antibodies are an example of many key interactions 4. Domains and assembly into higher order complexes Multimeric complexes 5. Exceptions to the Central Dogma of Molecular Biology and “structure gone bad” – RNAs as enzymes; Prions
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
4-9 Proteins exist in many shapes and sizes, however a few basic rules govern their structures Figure 4-9 Essential Cell Biology (© Garland Science 2010)
Background image of page 4
Summary of Panel 4 -1: Examples of general protein functions Enzymes Structural protein Transport protein Motor protein Storage protein Signaling Receptors Gene Regulators Special Purpose
Background image of page 5

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Proteins fold into conformations that represent energy minima Unfolded proteins are said to be denatured Molecular chaperones in the cell help proteins fold into their correct conformations
Background image of page 6
This is because relatively few of all the possible sequences create structures with stable energy minima. Synthetic proteins, especially peptides, can have any sequence. These will still obey the energy laws governing structure. Not all possible protein sequences are used by nature
Background image of page 7

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Proteins come in a variety of sizes and amino acid compositions.
Background image of page 8
Proteins I - Structure and Functions - Ch. 4 1. Roles of proteins in cells 2. Forces determining structure 3. Alpha Helices, Beta Sheets and Disulfides are core elements of the Secondary Structures of proteins - Antibodies are an example of many key interactions 4. Domains and assembly into higher order complexes Multimeric complexes 5. Exceptions to the Central Dogma of Molecular Biology and “structure gone bad” – RNAs as enzymes; Prions
Background image of page 9

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Proteins have four levels of structural organization Primary linear amino acid sequence Secondary folding patterns Tertiary 3D organization of secondary structures Protein domains Quaternary organization of protein complexes
Background image of page 10
its primary sequence .
Background image of page 11

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Image of page 12
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

Page1 / 57

Lecture 4 - Channel Setting Instructions for ResponseCard...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 12. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online