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Curulla RELI 140 Reflection 1

Curulla RELI 140 Reflection 1 - way Nietzsche talked about...

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Matt Curulla RELI 140 David McDuffie 1/11/12 When I first started reading The Gay Science, I wasn’t actually sure whether or not Nietzsche was an atheist or not. I read section 125 first as professor Ochoa instructed, then 108, and couldn’t quite tell what religion, if any, the author followed. Then I began to read section 109. As I began reading it, and thought about how Nietzsche was demystifying the most interesting and magical movements within our universe, it dawned on me, he was an Atheist. I’m sure you know that he was an atheist, and that’s not even what struck me about this piece. What really interested me was that if you step back and really look at all the natural phenomena throughout our universe, there is nothing inherently magnificent about them. The
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Unformatted text preview: way Nietzsche talked about these things, as if they were just objects, made me think about what a star really is, and what a planet is at its core. He disenchanted the idea of the Earth as a living being, specifically saying “Let us beware of thinking that the world is a living being,” and I was somewhat put off by this idea (Nietzsche, 167). As kids we are taught to be mystified and inspired by the vastness of the planet and of how it lives and breathes everywhere around us. In Nietzsche’s piece, though, he fights this, and I believe he was not only attacking religion, but he also simultaneously and maybe unbeknownst to him, attacked our infatuation with natural matters. Nietzsche, Friedrich. The Gay Science. New York: Vintagebooks, 1974. Print....
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