2:7:12 - THE PRINCE Fortune accounts for half of our...

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PHI363 2/7/12 LECTURE 7 Machiavelli and Thomas Hobbes (1588-1679) Machiavelli is thought of as the first political scientist Machiavelli’s Prince. Enemies: the wolves As a prince you must be sly and cunning Immoral friend could be more predictable than an amoral friend, but may be more dangerous, a racist could be an immoral person They may spit in the coffee they get you. Amoral would just be self interested You could just say it would be in your self interest to get me coffee Machiavelli is a defender of Pagan Morality Pagan means not Christian, or predated Christianity. He finds interest/value in things Christians don’t EX: Men find Glory in death in battle, women sleep with/marry a warrior. Someone who wants to be a warrior over being a Saint Ontology: Study of being Everything encompassing the universe Machiavelli’s: Fortuna: random luck But not completely random, the fox can master Fortuna Vir: Latin for Man
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Unformatted text preview: THE PRINCE Fortune accounts for half of our actions. Thomas Hobbes (1588-1679) Born in Elizabethan England Born because his mother was so afraid of the Spanish Armada were about to attack Britain, so she gave birth to him prematurely and out of fear. Two things that could be dangerous to us Our fellow citizens, Our foreign enemies American religious fanatics came from England and went to Massachusetts, Only place to dance was Rhode Island Hobbes is a defender of the absolute state (strong state) Romans Ch. 13 The Powers that be are ordained by god. They are justified by the ruler who is divine Popular Sovereignty Ascending theory The power of the ruler comes from the people Hobbes believes without the state or military, morality would completely go out the window. People are naturally harsh and violent. The thought of how without a state we fall apart, is the Hobbes and realists point of view....
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This note was uploaded on 02/17/2012 for the course PHI 363 taught by Professor Davidmorgan during the Spring '12 term at Syracuse.

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