Lect 3 - Techniques III

Lect 3 - Techniques III - Lecture 3: Techniques III, and...

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Unformatted text preview: Lecture 3: Techniques III, and Integrating Cells into Tissues- Notes for the beginning of class:- Discussion sections : moving/missing sections- Working in groups -> encouraged, but written work needs to be unique.- Previous exams and study guides will be posted.- Gradebook - make sure it is accurate.- If you are auditing the course and would like access to blackboard, that can be arranged.- Transmission Electron Microscopy Much higher resolution than optical microscopy . 0.1 nm vs 200 nm Can be used to directly visual molecules Suitable only for fixed, very thin specimens (<~100 nm). Transmission Electron Microscopy Samples generally need to be stained to be visualized. Histochemical stains such as osmium tetroxide (membranes) Immunochemical stains use gold particles. Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) Special techniques allow TEM to obtain unique information Can also use shadowing Freeze fracture, freeze etch: visualize membrane interior TEM, thin section TEM, freeze fracture Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM)...
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This note was uploaded on 02/16/2012 for the course BIOL_SCI 315 taught by Professor Beitel during the Spring '10 term at Northwestern.

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Lect 3 - Techniques III - Lecture 3: Techniques III, and...

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