liars poker - Bryan Saul 0592-1297 bsaul@ufl.edu Liars...

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Bryan Saul 0592-1297 bsaul@ufl.edu Liar’s Poker By: Michael Lewis Liar’s Poker, written by Michael Lewis, was published in late 1990, and has since become a classic. The book is regarded as a book that defines Wall Street during the 1980’s and takes the reader through one man’s experience climbing the ranks at the bond sales/trades powerhouse that was Salomon Brothers. The book opens with a flashback to one of Lewis’s foremost memories while working at Salomon Brothers. Then CEO, John Gutfreund walks across the office floor, approaches colleague John Meriwether, and challenges him to a game of Liar’s Poker worth one million dollars. The game, a high stakes form a gambling, is then constantly used as a metaphor throughout the book to further portray the risk and greed involved in what was considered the financial boom of the 1980’s. In addition to progressively going through Lewis’s experiences at Salomon Brothers, the book explains much of how the financial boom occurred; the financial instruments that came into play, and what ultimately lead to the downfall of Salomon Brothers. First and foremost, Liar’s Poker is an autobiographical book of Michael Lewis’s encounters leading up to his employment and during his employment at Salomon Brothers. He recounts meeting an executive’s wife at a royal ball while living in London,
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This note was uploaded on 02/17/2012 for the course FIN 4504 taught by Professor Banko during the Spring '08 term at University of Florida.

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liars poker - Bryan Saul 0592-1297 bsaul@ufl.edu Liars...

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