350.227.Syllabus (1)

350.227.Syllabus (1) - English 227 The Survey of American...

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Unformatted text preview: English 227 The Survey of American Literature: the Gothic Spring 2011 Rutgers University Professor Jackson Class Meets: Tues/ Thurs 1:10—2:30 Old Queens Hall 112 Phone: (732) 932—4388 Office Hours: M 3:00-4:30 and by appointment gregjackson@rutgers.edu Instructors: Mr. Ryan wjryan@eden .rutgers .edu Mr. Becker beckerb@eden.rutgers.edu Office Hours: Tuesday 3:00—4:00 Office Hours: Thursday 11:00—12:00 TA‘ Joe Filoramo ioefilo@eden.rutgers.edu Meet by appointment All Office Hours (unless otherwise stipulated) are in Old Queens Hall 112 Required Texts: Ann Radcliffe, The Sicilian Romance Frederick Douglass, Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, an American Slave Herman Melville, Benito Cereno Mark Twain, The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn Sakai: Please get onto Sakai for additional material: sakai.rutgers.edu YOU ARE REQUIRED to PRINT ALL MATERIAL from SAKAI Graded Assignments: Quizzes: 30% Midterm 1: 20% Midterm 2: 20% Paper: 15% Participation: 15% Course Description and Objectives: If you like reading spine—tingling fiction set in dark landscapes, dilapidated manor houses, subterranean caverns, and ancient forests—stories about heroes and heroines imprisoned by family secrets, ancestral pasts, ominous futures, brooding lovers, or shadowy Villains—then you will enjoy the reading for this course. We will begin in the seventeenth century and arrive by semester’s end much nearer our own time. Beginning with the literature of the American Puritans—tracing an aesthetic we might think of as the “Calvinist sublime”—will provide us with the broadest possible canvas with which to examine what purports to be a national theme: the gothic. We will use these early works of colonial literature to theorize the nature of fear and the aesthetic of terror. What made such an aesthetic so popular in the American colonies and throughout the nineteenth and twentieth centuries? As the renowned critic of American literature Leslie Fiedler once observed, gothic is the “national literary style”; indeed, one is hard pressed to think of a single important author before 1960 who didn’t write something-if not a good deal—in the gothic mode. The historian Richard Hofstadter found that American culture from its origins through the twentieth century evinced a particular sense of or fascination with political intrigue, conspiracy, and social fear that he dubbed America’s “paranoid style.” In this survey of American literature we are going to test Fiedler’s and Hofstadter’s theses in a range of genres, from sermon, autobiography, and slave narrative, to novel, short story, and essay. How and why did gothic come to occupy-or haunt— the American imagination? In what ways did New World environs, colonial isolation, religious belief, and suspicion of science and industrialization—or the anxiety over national war, race, immigration, class mobility, and urbanization—engender a taste for I gothic literature? What do gothic tropes say about our national imaginary? Does it have a special relevance for race, Native American removal, internecine conflict, and class strife? What does it say about us as Americans, about the diverse influences of our cultural heritage? We will attempt to address some of these questions by addressing genre in relation to particular historical moments, surveying regional literary practices and print technology, and by coming to a fuller understanding of the American Protestant tradition. Expect to reencounter old friends like Poe, Twain, and Melville, and perhaps make some new acquaintances such as William Bradford, Charles Brockden Brown, Charles Chesnutt, and Flannery O’Connor. ' A word about pacing: this course is designed to introduce you to a broad sweep of American literature. Don’t mistake, this is a college—level course and will be paced accordingly—which is to say that we will be covering a large body of material, but at a relatively moderate speed. Read the assigned works, along with all relevant introductions and footnotes in advance of the lectures, and again afterwards if possible. Take notes; write down your questionsand reactions; bring them up in class. Talk to your ‘ classmates. Look up unfamiliar words in the dictionary—preferably the Oxford English Dictionary, available in the library and online. At the end of this course, you should have a detailed knowledge of both American literature and what we mean when we say the “gothic.” You will also have a deep understanding of some of the major theories that might be used to analyze it as a cultural form of production. And you will, I hope, have had a lot of fun reading and wrestling with some truly amazing texts, and perhaps discovering some works that you will return to again over the course of your life. Attendance, preferably alert and involved, is mandatory. Two absences are allowed without penalty; each additional absence will lower your grade by half a grade and may result in an administrative drop. Put another way, if you miss more than 2 classes you will not do well in this course. Finally, the initial days of the course count in the absence tally, whether or not you were enrolled at the time. No one will be added after the second week of the course. Before the beginning of each class, four roll sheets will be simultaneously circulated. Please sign (your signature) ONLY on the line next to your name. Do not, under any circumstances sign anyone else’s name to the attendance sheet. Doing so is “Academic Dishonesty” and will result in the expulsion of both parties. Please do NOT let anyone talk you into signing his or her name. Anyone arriving after the roll sheets have been collected will be marked absent for that day. Punctual Arrival Please come to each class on time, early if possible. Do not come in late. In a class this size, arriving late distracts your colleagues and your professor. (Please don’t say the bus or train was late. Catch an earlier bus each class day so you have a safe margin before class begins.) Three times late equals one absence; and every late after is another absence—and all this in addition to missed quizzes. N0 Class-time breaks Y Please do not get up during class. Please use the facilities before coming to class. Exams will cover the assigned reading, including all relevant introductions and notes, as well as material discussed in lecture. Quizzes will not be announced in advance and cannot be made up. On days in which there is a quiz (almost every day), we will hand the quiz out at the beginning of class. (So don’t arrive late.) Mandatory Appointments: You will be required to Visit my office for two conferences this semester. The first conference will take place in the first three weeks of class by appointment. I will pass around a sign up sheet. Please put your name in one slot and then write the time and date down on your calendar (please do not miss your appointment!) In addition, you should feel free to drop by my office hours regularly —- to review material, to discuss material you find confusing (or exciting), to ask questions, to say hello. If you can’t make the regular hours, schedulean appointment. If you can’t do that, send me an email. This is a big class, in more ways than one; please try not to.. get lost. ' Any unacknowledged use of another’s words or ideas constitutes plagiarism and will be vigorously prosecuted. If you are unsure how or when to cite sources, please see me, and see your student handbook for plagiarism’s dramatic consequences. Computers in the Classroom We will permit the use of computers during lectures and reviews solely for note taking and to search for appropriate information or material (but please turn off sound and any form of sound notification). Do not use your computer in the classroom for ANY other purpose: no email, extra—curricular web surfing, Facebook, etc. If caught doing any other activity extraneous to the lecture—you will lose your computer privileges for the semester. No exceptions. Cell phones, calling, texting, tweeting All cell phones must be turned off and remain off for the duration of the course and must remain in your backpack or book bag. Under no circumstances may you text or tweet in the class. Violators will be asked to leave on the first infraction. Movies Twice during the semester‘we will meet on a Monday evening at 7 to watch a classic gothic film. Or you may view the movie through Netflix or download them from iTunes. PLEASE plan ahead. With weeks of notice every student should be able to arrange his or her schedule for these important screenings. We will attach significant participation points and quiz points to these events. Marathon Reading: RU Day Huckleberry Finn Please reserve Saturday, April 23 , from 7 am to 6 pm. Schedule of Assignments Read the entire work before the first day for which it has been scheduled. January _ Week 1_ T 18 Introduction of faculty and students: course expectations and a brief history of Gothic literature TH 20 William Bradford, from Journals: 348—350; [The Starving Time] 355—357; [Great and Fearful Earthquake] 364—65; [Wickedness Breaks Forth] 365—66; [A Horrible Case of Bestiality] 366—67; Michael Wigglesworth, from.the Diary, 43 8—439; 439—443. All on Sakai Week 2_' , . ' . ' T 25 Thomas Shepard, Autobiography: pp. 391—418 (Sakai) TH 27 Mary Rowlandson, 461—463; from A Narrative of the ' Captivity, 464—492 (Sakai) February . r Week 3— T 1 Witchcraft Material: TBA (Sakai) TH 3 Jonathan Edwards, Sinners in the Hands of an Angry God (Sakai); John Locke, Human Understanding TBA (Sakai) Week 4— T' 8 Adam Smith, excerpt, Theory of Moral Sentiment TBA Charles Brockden Brown, Baxter episode from Ormond; Locke, Human Understanding excerpts (Sakai) TH 10 Anne Radcliffe, Sicilian Romance; Edmund Burke, Philosophical Enquiry (Sakai) Week 5_ T 15 Sicilian Romance; Philosophical Enquiry (Sakai) TH 17 Sicilian Romance (finish); Philosophical Enquiry (Sakai) Week 6 M 21 FILM NIGHT: The Last Exorcism T 22 Charles Brockden Brown, “Preface” to Edgar Huntly (Sakai); Edgar Allan Poe, “Preface” to the Tales of Grotesque and Arabesque (Sakai); “Somnambulism” (Sakai) TH 24 Washington Irving, “The Legend of Sleepy Hollow” (Sakai) ' March Week 7 T 1 Poe, “Ligeia” and “The Black Cat” (Sakai) TH 3 Poe, “The Fall of the House of Usher” (Sakai); Radio Program: Gothic and aurality Week 8___ i T 8 Poe, “The Gold—Bug” (Sakai) TH 10 Midterm 1; 25 dates committed to memory Week 0 T 15 Spring Break TH 17 Spring Break Week 9 T 22 Frederick Douglass, Narrative of the Life TH 24 Douglass, Narrative; Martin Luther King, Jr., “Letter from Birmingham Jail” (Sakai); Barack Obama, Philadelphia speech on race: “A More Perfect Union” (Sakai) Week 10 T 29 Herman Melville, Benito Cereno TH 31 ‘ Melville, Benito Cereno; Stephen Crane, “An Experiment in Misery” (Sakai); Jacob Riis, selections from How the Other Half Lives (Sakai) April Week 11 M 4 Movie: T 0 Kill a Mockingbird T 5 Ellen Gilchrist, “Victory Over Japan” (Sakai) TH 7 Flannery O’Connor, “A Good Man is Hard to Find” (Sakai) Week 12 T 12 Charles Chesnutt, “The Wife of His Youth” and “Po’ Sandy” (Sakai) TH 14 Mark Twain, The Adventures of Huckleberry F inn; LA Times and New York Times op—ed pieces (Sakai) Week 13 T 19 Midterm 2; 50 dates TH 21 Huck Finn Saturday 23 Marathon Reading: Huckleberry Finn, 7:00 am to 6:00 pm Week 14 T 26 Huck F inn TH 28 Final Day of Class Huck Finn; PAPER DUE ...
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This note was uploaded on 02/17/2012 for the course SAS 101 taught by Professor Unsure during the Spring '11 term at Rutgers.

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350.227.Syllabus (1) - English 227 The Survey of American...

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