30 - Chapter 30: Microbial Interactions I. Microbial...

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Chapter 30: Microbial Interactions I. Microbial interactions A. Mutualism= obligatory and both host and symbiont benefits A.1. Microorganism-insect mutualism: termites (host) contain Trichonympha (protist/endosymbiont) to digest the cellulose found in wood to create glucose-6-phosphate which produces CO2, H2, acetate (the preferred carbon source); and nitrogen-fixing bacteria to convert N2 to NH3 which is converted to glutamine by Trichonympha and converted to amino acids and cofactors by TG1 (bacterial endosymbiont of Trichonmpha); TG1 also ferments glucose to acetate, H2, and CO2; acetogens (free-swimming gut bacteria) boost acetate levels through reductive acetogenesis. A.2. Zooxanthellae: hermatypic (reef-building) coral (host) contain dinoflagellates genus Symbiodinium (protist/endosymbiont) in the lining of the gastrodermal tissue. Symbiodinium provide their photosynthate (fixed carbon) to fulfill energy requirements, in exchange for nitrogenous compounds, phosphates, CO2, and protection from UV light. Additionally,
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This note was uploaded on 02/17/2012 for the course BIOL 351 taught by Professor Sig during the Fall '08 term at Texas A&M.

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30 - Chapter 30: Microbial Interactions I. Microbial...

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