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Presentation1 - Soy Val Grayson Jessica Gimbel Kenzie Weber...

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Soy Val Grayson Jessica Gimbel Kenzie Webe r
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Background Information The soybean is part of a species of legumes Native to East Asia The soybean is grown mostly for its edible bean Which has many uses
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Name and Classification The soy plant is sometimes referred to as the “greater bean” The English word “soy” is derived from the Japanese pronunciation of “shōyu Genus name: Glycine max (L.) Merr  Glycine and Soja (wild) = two subgenera of Gly cine W illd
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Chemical Composition Oil and protein content account for 60% of the weight of dry soybeans Protein: 40% Oil: 20% The rest consists on 35% carbohydrate and about 5% ash Soybean cultivars are comprised of 8% seed coat (hull), 90% cotyledon and 2% hypocotyl
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Physical Characteristics Soy varies in growth and habit The height varies from below 20 cm to up to 2 meters The pods stems and leaves are covered with fine brown or gray hairs The leaves of the plant are trifoliolate: having three to four leaflets per leaf Each leaflet is 6-15 cm long and 2-7 cm wide
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Fruit
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