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Lecture 16 - 03:35 Review Reasonsforincrease(pull/push)...

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03:35 Review Increase in female labor force participation    one of the most important changes in  the America family in the second half of the 20 th  century – had important  consequences for the family  Reasons for increase (pull/push) – did the economy force women into labor or did were  women compelled to join the force  Since the world war – when started collecting data on female labor force participation  Has risen without any interruptions since the WWII to the 2000s (may have fallen little  from economy crisis) Rise in FLFP overall on average  Increase in FLFP for mothers of young children  Pull:  1. women have more education than they did in the past   time in the labor force has  become more valuable  2. Liberalization of gender role attitudes across the country (affect women and men)  far more acceptable for women to work in the labor force  Push:  1. Decline of earnings or working and lower middle class and middle class men,  traditional male breadwinner jobs disappeared or paid less and less   became an  economic necessity for women to work whether they liked it or not  Families have no choice  Consequences of increase in FLFP – decline of the breadwinner-homemaker model  Majority of households today are dual households   shift in gender balance of power in  households  Mothers’ time with children – how increase in FLFP affects children  Remarkable fact: despite higher fem LFP, time spent with children may not have  declined Since 1965 sociologists have collected “time diaries” – go into peoples homes to get  data on what families do  Studies are important because they give insight on the minute by minute life of  American families
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Confirmed what everyone already thought – employed mothers spend less time with  their kids and on childrearing tasks than non-employed mothers BUT  1. the difference in time spent with kids between employed and non-employed mothers  is much smaller than people thought Less than 10%  2. Between 1960 and 1990 the amount of time that mom spent with kids decline very  little   complete surprise to scientific community  FLFP had increased during this time very rapidly  Preview Mothers’ time with children  Why has it not systematically decreased?
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