Lecture 17 - 03:36 Review Careworkandhousework

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–4. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
03:36 Review Care work and housework  Care work – intimate, emotional tasks used to be done by one family member for  another family member that was dependent  Is increasingly marketized Who does what? Why do men do certain things? Why do women do certain things  Second shift: Usually if men work full time in the labor force, that’s all they do. But if married women  work in the labor force, they find a second shift of work at home (all housework) Concept invented in the 1980s  Men and women still work total hours the same  How are hours divided amongst different tasks? Always a conflict of interest between men and women Who gets to do what they want?  Understanding gender division of household labor Power & authority Who has power  – if other has more power, can threaten spouse to do what other wants  Authority  – way to get one’s will legitimately to the other  Self-reinforcing mechanisms Strategies of coming to terms with inequality 
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
“Family myths” Preview Parents and Children Socialization Parenting styles Baumrind: educational styles   classic differentiation of parenting styles  Fathers Lareau: educational styles by class, intergenerational transmission of social status What does parenting do in terms of class structure  MacLanahan: parental resources by education Role of Parents Childrearing is one central task of the public family (as well as elder care)   what public  family has done  always   Childrearing: parents provide: 1. Material support  – food, shelter, protection  2. Emotional support  – love  3. Control  – decision making for child, give boundaries, protect from misbehaving by  helping them to fit in Parents endow children with skills and provide resources for child development in its  future place in the world!  Parental circumstances and parenting powerfully shape life chances of next generation  Intergenerational transmission of class position Challenges popular rhetoric of autonomy and personal responsibility, and equal  opportunity Socialization
Background image of page 2
Socialization involves parents, peers, media  Two stages of socialization: Primary socialization : happens from birth until pre-adolescence (age 12) – period where  parents teach child to be general member of a culture  Learning norms, attitudes, language   behaviors that enable membership of a culture  Secondary socialization : less obvious, starts in adolescence through 20s  Learning how to function in particular groups within society (e.g. profession)   comes  through higher education  See that childhood friends may be heading in different directions in life 
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Image of page 4
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

This note was uploaded on 02/17/2012 for the course SOC 120 taught by Professor Staff during the Fall '08 term at University of Wisconsin.

Page1 / 11

Lecture 17 - 03:36 Review Careworkandhousework

This preview shows document pages 1 - 4. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online