research methods- research paper 2

research methods- research paper 2 - Running head: IMPLICIT...

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Running head: IMPLICIT WEIGHT ATTITUDES, SELF-IMAGE, AND GENDER Implicit Attitudes of Weight as a Function of Self-Image and Gender Susan Martinez and Brandi Donehoo University of Pittsburgh 1
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Running head: IMPLICIT WEIGHT ATTITUDES, SELF-IMAGE, AND GENDER Abstract This study examined three variables regarding obesity in America. It studied the effects of gender attitudes, self-image attitudes, and the relationship between gender and self-image on weight. Data was collected from 32 participants using an Implicit Association Test (IAT) on weight bias and a self-image satisfaction questionnaire. Of the 32 participants, 17 participants were male (M = -1.4118, SD = 1.62245), and 15 of the participants were female (M = -1.0667, SD = 1.48645). It was predicted that one’s gender had no influence over attitudes projected towards weight. In addition, self-image was also predicted to not have an effect on weight issues. This study also predicted that the interaction of gender and self-image had no significant affect on weight bias. This hypothesis was supported by using a 2 x 3 between-subjects Analysis of Variance (ANOVA) experiment design. The results proved to uphold the hypotheses of no significant differences between gender attitudes, self-image attitudes, and the interaction of gender and self-image to have an effect on perspectives on weight. 2
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Running head: IMPLICIT WEIGHT ATTITUDES, SELF-IMAGE, AND GENDER The Implicit Attitudes of Weight as a Function of Self-Image and Gender Krentz (2006) estimated that there are over a billion people who are overweight and that of those number, three million are obese. Obesity is one of the last remaining facets of accepted discrimination (Davison & Birch, 2004). Discrimination for those that are obese can be seen from employers (Grover, Keel, & Mitchell, 2003), doctors (Krentz, 2006), and even one’s own family (Puhl & Brownell, 2006). It is important to determine if any factors attribute to the discrimination to prevent it from occurring in the future. This study looks into whether gender, self-image, or gender and self-image can affect weight attitudes. Past research varies on whether gender plays a role in determining weight attitudes. In a study by Latner, Stunkard, & Wilson (2005), preferences of men and women’s friend selection were studied. The option that the subject could choose was a friend that was obese, had various disabilities, or had no disability. Their study showed that there was greater bias towards women than men. But research conducted by Crandall (1994) showed that gender had no effect on weight bias. Another area that benefits from further clarification in this study is self-image. Self-image plays an important role in one’s overall well-being. Pasha & Golshekoh (2009) found in their study that women are more unsatisfied with their body then men. In a related study, Davison & Birch (2004) met with parents and their 9 year old daughters to conduct a questionnaire evaluating normal characteristics and also possible predictors
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This note was uploaded on 02/17/2012 for the course PSY 0035 taught by Professor Barbkucinski during the Spring '08 term at Pittsburgh.

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research methods- research paper 2 - Running head: IMPLICIT...

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