chapter10 - Elizabeth Sutka 14 November 2011 SOC 335 A...

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Elizabeth Sutka 14 November 2011 SOC 335 – A Chapter 10 Where is the sociology in this chapter? The system of higher education correlates with the hierarchy system that we have read about and discussed in class. The hierarchy system preserves class reproduction, and that definitely affects who is receiving higher education and what type of higher education that is. As the chapter points out, college admission is based on grades, activities, recommendations, and test scores. Many people argue that the problem with test scores is that wealthy people can afford to hire tutors or send their children to expensive classes to train and teach them for these tests, and poorer people cannot. Many believe that these tests are very unfair to minority students. Therefore, college is more easily available to more affluent people who cannot only pay for college itself, but can pay for activities and extracurricular that will help their children get in. “Students from lower socioeconomic backgrounds are more likely to go to college with lower selectivity, such as two-year and open-enrollment institutions, regardless of their ability, achievement, and expectations.” (Ballantine, 261) The text goes on to say that “elite
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This note was uploaded on 02/19/2012 for the course SOC 335 taught by Professor Tedwaegenaar during the Fall '11 term at Miami University.

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chapter10 - Elizabeth Sutka 14 November 2011 SOC 335 A...

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