lecture05-chapter03 - Operating Systems Operating Lecture...

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Operating Systems Operating Systems Lecture 05: Lecture 05: VMs, OS examples, Processes VMs, OS examples, Processes Anda Iamnitchi anda@cse.usf.edu 1
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Today Today Announcements: Operating Systems Overview: Virtual Machines Windows vs. Unix vs. Linux: study cases Processes (Chapter 3) 2
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Virtual Machines and Virtual Machines and Virtualization Virtualization Virtualization enables a single PC or server to simultaneously run multiple operating systems or multiple sessions of a single OS a machine can host numerous applications, including those that run on different operating systems, on a single platform host operating system can support a number of virtual machines (VM) each has the characteristics of a particular OS and, in some versions of virtualization, the characteristics of a particular hardware platform 3
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Virtual Virtual Machin Machin e e Concept Concept 4
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Process Virtual Machines Process Virtual Machines 5
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System Virtual Machines System Virtual Machines 6
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Traditional UNIX Systems Traditional UNIX Systems Were developed at Bell Labs and became operational on a PDP-7 in 1970 Incorporated many ideas from Multics PDP-11was a milestone because it first showed that UNIX would be an OS for all computers Next milestone was rewriting UNIX in the programming language C demonstrated the advantages of using a high-level language for system code Was described in a technical journal for the first time in 1974 First widely available version outside Bell Labs was Version 6 in 1976 Version 7, released in 1978 is the ancestor of most modern UNIX systems Most important of the non-AT&T systems was UNIX BSD (Berkeley Software Distribution) 7
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Traditional Traditional UNIX Kernel UNIX Kernel 9
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Modern UNIX Kernel Modern UNIX Kernel 10
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LINUX Overview LINUX Overview Started out as a UNIX variant for the IBM PC Linus Torvalds, a Finnish student of computer science, wrote the initial version Linux was first posted on the Internet in 1991 Today it is a full-featured UNIX system that runs on several platforms Is free and the source code is available Key to success has been the availability of free software packages Highly modular and easily configured 11
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Modular Modular Monolithic Kernel Monolithic Kernel Includes virtually all of the OS functionality in one large
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lecture05-chapter03 - Operating Systems Operating Lecture...

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