Eng Paper 3 - Kathryn Beddow ENC 1102 Crombie EXP3 Fallacy...

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Unformatted text preview: Kathryn Beddow November 19, 2011 ENC 1102 Crombie EXP3 Fallacy, Fallacy, Oh the Fallacy In Max Shulman’s story Love is a Fallacy, he uses a relatable situation—“love” among college students—to illustrate various fallacies that are often used in everyday life. One fallacy that Shulman illustrates is “poisoning the well.” Poisoning the well is common, especially in politics. In political campaigns, many in “the race” choose to smear the name(s) of their opponent(s) in order to discredit them. By attempting to discredit their opponents, the politician’s morality is dwindling, and no one is addressing the true concerns of the people and topic(s) at hand. Another example of poising the well begin used is when male one friend is attracted to a female friend, and that female is interested in another male. The male friend may point out flaws in the female’s choice by saying things like “He’s a jerk. Do you really want to date him?” or “Did you see who he was with last things like “He’s a jerk....
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Eng Paper 3 - Kathryn Beddow ENC 1102 Crombie EXP3 Fallacy...

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