Lecture 3 - 03:08 Data Collection Where do we get our...

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Unformatted text preview: 03:08 Data Collection Where do we get our information? Population- the entire group we wish to study Samples- a subset of the population, rather than study everyone we look at a subset of the group, who is in the sample has an impact on your findings Representative sample- all of the members of the sample match the larger population so that it looks the same, same percents male/female etc., best thing to have but impossible to get Random Sample- everyone in the population has an equal chance of being able to be in the sample, will look like the population because it is random Convenience sample- we recruit people who are available, realistic Biased sample- any sample that is not a random sample, not bad What data do we collect? Operational definition- how we define what we are studying in our research Measure- what we use to collect information about each phenomena Observation Goal is description Naturalistic Observation- goal is to describe a certain phenomena, people are observed in their natural surroundings, animals or humans Survey-(interviews and questionnaires), advantage is that it can be given to a lot of people and is fast, but only get data about what you ask Case studies- studying one or two people in depth over a period of time, used on...
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This note was uploaded on 02/18/2012 for the course PSYCH 202 taught by Professor Roberts during the Fall '06 term at Wisconsin.

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Lecture 3 - 03:08 Data Collection Where do we get our...

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