Lecture 20

Lecture 20 - Consequences for Spouses Crisis period: one to...

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03:04 Micro Explanations I Age at marriage Strong risk factor Cannot explain macro trends Lack of homogamy Weak but consistent risk factor Parental divorce Strong risk factor Intergenerational transmission Not simply by absence of second parent Micro Explanations  II Strong predictor of divorce Likely pure selection, not causation Cohabiters more likely to divorce regardless of cohabitation But may actually decrease divorce Trial marriage: worse “matches” weeded out in cohabitation, better matches sort into  marriage Cohabitation prevents divorces by preventing formation of potentially doomed marriages No effect for cohabiters who do marry their partner Divorce as a Process Distinguish between marital conflict, separation, and legal divorce Divorce Separation of assets (tangible and intangible) Legal and physical child custody (still mostly with mothers)
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Joint custody (co-parenting vs. parallel parenting)
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Unformatted text preview: Consequences for Spouses Crisis period: one to two years of intense emotional upheaval, ambiguous attachment for both spouses Consequences for women Sharp decrease in average economic well-being (30% decline in standard of living, residential moves, living with parents) Alimony (increasingly rare) Child support (60% if divorced mothers supposed to receive support, 46% of divorced mothers get anything) Consequences for men Average divorced man suffers economic hardship, less than average divorced woman (average male standard of living declines 15-20%- loss of wifes income, economies of scale and support payments) Tight coupling of marriage and fatherhood for men (sharp decline in contact with children, however, increase in single father families, often coresident with other relatives) 03:04 03:04...
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Lecture 20 - Consequences for Spouses Crisis period: one to...

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