Chapter 13_food safety

Chapter 13_food safety - Chapter13 FoodSafety and...

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HPEB 502 – Fall 2011 Dr. Kara Montgomery Chapter 13 Food Safety and  Technology
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U.S. enjoys one of safest food supplies in world Millions still suffer annually from some type of foodborne  illness 48 million affected  http://www.cdc.gov/foodborneburden/  About 128,000 hospitalizations and 3,000 deaths This more recent data differs from statistics in our textbook! Food safety practices and guidelines established to ensure  the safety of foods from farm to table Upton Sinclair’s 1906 book, The Jungle ,   led to Meat  Inspection Act Food safety precautions led to positive health effects in the U.S. What Is Food Safety and  Why Is It Important?
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What Causes Foodborne Illness  and How Can It Make You Sick? Foodborne illnesses are often caused by  pathogens . Can be spread by fecal-to-oral transmission Viruses :  require living host to survive Examples: Norovirus, Hepatitis A  Bacteria  flourish on living and nonliving surfaces. Some bacteria are beneficial such as the ones that make vitamin K  and biotin in intestines, or the ones used to make yogurt and  cheese Other bacteria can cause food spoilage and illness!
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What Causes Foodborne Illness  and How Can It Make You Sick?  –  continued -   Parasites :  microscopic organisms that take  nourishment from hosts Chemical agents  and  toxins  also cause illness. Naturally-occurring toxins include poisonous  mushrooms and some fish. Pesticides added to foods also cause foodborne illness. Prions:  extremely rare but deadly infectious agent Bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) Some people are at higher risk for foodborne illness : Older adults, young children, and those with compromised 
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Pathogens That Cause  Foodborne Illness See Table 13.1 in our  textbook
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What Can You Do to Prevent  Foodborne Illness? Practice “4 Cs” of food safety: 1. C lean your hands and produce. Hands: hot soapy water with agitation for at least twenty  seconds Sanitize cutting boards, sponges Wash fruits and vegetables under cold running water,  scrub firm skins with vegetable brush 2. C ombat cross-contamination. Keep raw meat, poultry, fish separate from other foods  during preparation, storage, and transport
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3. C ook foods thoroughly. Color not reliable indicator: measure internal temperature  (see Table 13.2) 4. C hill foods at a low enough temperature. Bacteria multiply rapidly between 40o – 140o F
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This note was uploaded on 02/20/2012 for the course HPEB 502 taught by Professor Montgomery during the Fall '09 term at South Carolina.

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Chapter 13_food safety - Chapter13 FoodSafety and...

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