Chapter 10 Notes_Class

Chapter 10 Notes_Class - Chapter10 WeightManagement...

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Chapter 10 Weight Management Fall 2011
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Weight management:  maintaining weight within a  healthy range. Healthy weight: Overweight: 68.3% of American adults are overweight. Obesity: 33.9% of Americans are obese. Source: JAMA, Flegal KM et al, 2010 What Is Weight Management and  Why Is It Important?
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Risks of Overweight Being overweight increases risks of hypertension,  stroke, heart disease, gallbladder disease, type 2  diabetes, osteoarthritis, some cancers, and sleep  apnea. Losing as little as 10-20 lbs reduces risk
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Underweight:  weighing too little for your height May be caused by: excessive calorie restriction and/or  physical activity, underlying medical condition, emotional  stress At risk for: Underweight
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How Do You Know If You Are at a  Healthy Weight? One common method: 1) Measure your Body Mass Index (BMI): BMI   =  weight (lbs) x 703 height squared (in2)
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Body Fat Measurement Measure your body fat and its location: Average healthy adult male between 20 – 49:  16 – 21% of weight is body fat Average healthy adult female:  22 – 26% body fat Techniques for measuring amount of body fat: 1. skinfold thickness measurements 2. bioelectrical impedance 3. dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry (DEXA) 4. underwater weighing  5. air displacement (BodPod)
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RECENT LINE OF THINKING: Central obesity  (excess visceral fat) increases risk of heart disease,  diabetes, and hypertension. NEW REPORT from the British Medical Journal  The  Lancet Contradicts information that waist size  predicts CVD! http ://www.thelancet.com/journals/lancet/article/PIIS0140-   After adjustment for age, sex, and smoking status  And THEN After further adjustment for baseline systolic  blood pressure, history of diabetes, and total and HDL  cholesterol  Waist Circumference
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How at Risk Are  You  for Health  Problems  Related to Weight  ? Figure 10.4
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Energy Balance Energy balance is “calories in” versus “calories  out.” Positive energy balance:   Negative energy balance: Energy needs are different for everyone. Energy needs comprised of: 1. Basal metabolism 2. Thermic effect of food 3. Physical activities
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Basal Metabolic Rate (BMR) Your BMR will increase your energy needs. Minimum energy needed to keep you alive (meet  basic physiological needs) Makes up about  % total energy needs Many factors affect BMR (Table 10.2)
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Amount of calories expended to digest, absorb, and 
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This note was uploaded on 02/20/2012 for the course HPEB 502 taught by Professor Montgomery during the Fall '09 term at South Carolina.

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Chapter 10 Notes_Class - Chapter10 WeightManagement...

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