test2 with plates

test2 with plates - THE MUSCULO-SKELETAL SYSTEM (includes...

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44 THE MUSCULO-SKELETAL SYSTEM (includes Drills # 38-51)
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45 Plate 4
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46 This is the first of several lessons dealing with the various systems of the human body. We hope and expect that you will use the methods of associative learning that you have studied in the earlier lessons of this course as a tool to help you acquire mastery of this new material. In this lesson you will learn the names of some of the more important bones of the human skeleton using the associative tactics presented earlier in the program. At this point, we hope that you have discarded as inefficient the learning method sometimes called "rote memorization." What follows will give you not only an understanding of where certain bones are located, but when possible, an etymological explanation of the word as well. Cranium : The word cranium comes from the Greek word kranion , a word meaning "head" and is also related to ker from which the word cere bellum is derived. Ker is related to keras (Latin, cornu ) meaning "horn," since the horn of an animal is at the top of the head. The cranium, commonly referred to as the skull, is made up of eight bones: frontal, sphenoid, ethmoid, lacrimal, nasal, zygomatic, parietal, and occipital. Mandible : Commonly called the lower jaw or jaw bone, mandible comes from the Latin verb mandare , meaning "to chew." It is sometimes called the inferior maxilla. Maxilla : Sometimes called the jaw, maxilla usually refers to the upper jaw (superior maxilla). Maxilla comes from the Latin word maxilla , the diminutive form of mala meaning "jaw" or "cheek." Clavicle : Commonly known as the collarbone, this word comes from the Latin clavicula , meaning "a little key" or "door bolt." This is the diminutive of the base form clavis ("key") which is derived from the Greek word kleis also meaning "key." Clavicle is applied to the bone from its shape. Scapula : Commonly called the shoulder-blade, this word comes from the Latin noun scapulae meaning "shoulder-blades." Humerus : This bone is located in the upper arm between the scapula and the ulna (the larger bone of the forearm). The word humerus is derived from the Latin noun humerus meaning the "upper arm, shoulder," and is related to the Greek omos , also meaning "shoulder." It is not a funny bone and should certainly be taken seriously. Ulna : The inner and larger bone of the forearm, the name is derived from the Latin noun ulna meaning "elbow, arm." It is itself not the elbow, the elbow being a joint where the humerus and ulna articulate (i.e. meet to form a joint). Radius : From the Latin word radius meaning "ray." The radius is the shorter bone of the arm.
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47 Spinal/Vertebral Column : The vertebral column consists of 33 bones: 7 cervical, 12 thoracic, 5 lumbar, 5 sacral vertebrae forming one bone, and 4 coccygeal vertebrae fused into one bone. The vertebral or spinal column encloses the spinal cord, which extends from the medulla to the 2nd lumbar vertebra. All nerves to the trunk and limbs issue from here, and it is the center of reflex action
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This note was uploaded on 02/20/2012 for the course CLAS 230 taught by Professor Dr.hamby during the Spring '12 term at South Carolina.

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test2 with plates - THE MUSCULO-SKELETAL SYSTEM (includes...

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