lecture 5 overhead_basow & rubin(1)

lecture 5 overhead_basow & rubin(1) - 1 Gender...

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1 Gender Influences on Adolescent Development Susan Basow & Lisa Rubin
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2 Adolescence Girls increasingly face expectations to conform to female gender role prescriptions (how they “should” be) Research has identified girls’ risks that are associated with conflicting societal expectations (i.e., risks from conflicting social prescriptions) Back to the recurring theme of diversity of experience : Lack of research for diversity of experiences encountered by girls of varying racial, ethnic, socioeconomic groups. Girls who have membership in non-dominant culture groups often experience gender role expectations that differ from those of the dominant culture. Some of the research in this ch addresses aspects of: Dominant culture: European American Minority cultures of African American, Latina/o, Asian, Lesbian GENDER: a psychological and cultural term that refers to the meaning attached to being female or male in a particular culture.
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3 SEX: refers to the biological aspects of being male or female GENDER ROLES: based on evaluations of behaviors as either masculine or feminine; varies across cultures GENDER IDENTITY: one’s subjective feelings of maleness or femaleness. Gender role identity (a.k.a. sex typing) describes the degree to which an individual identifies with the definitions of masculinity or femininity constructed by a given society. In the US, societal expectations include stereotypic beliefs about men and women’s traits: Agentic traits - men “should” be strong in these examples are competency, instrumentality, activity. Communal traits - women “should” be strong in these examples are warmth, expressiveness, nurturance.
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4 TRADITIONALLY, these traits have been viewed as opposite and mutually exclusive. IS THAT TRUE? What does the research suggest?
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5 Research suggests most males/females are not solely masculine/feminine, but a combination of traits. Males, on average, demonstrate more assertive traits. Females, on average, demonstrate more nurturant traits. Masculine - high in agentic traits Feminine - high in communal traits Undifferentiated - low in both agentic/communal traits Cross sex-typed - has traits associated w/the other sex For European American middle-class college students (Bem, 1981): 40% - traditional sex type 30% - androygynous 20% - undifferentiated 10% - cross sex-typed Even though cultural stereotypes of masculine/feminine traits is not research-supported, it still serves as cultural standards against which one judges the self and others. At the start of adolescence, these gender role expectations become salient, as gender identity develops.
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6 Gender role expectations - are they stable or do they change over time? Why? Example: War time Societal expectations create hierarchical gender role segregation. Traditionally: Roles assigned to women tend to be low status, low paying (homemaker, childrearing, nurse, teacher, service
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This note was uploaded on 02/20/2012 for the course PYSC 310 taught by Professor Ms.fields during the Spring '12 term at South Carolina.

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lecture 5 overhead_basow & rubin(1) - 1 Gender...

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