Lect7_0902 - acidbase reaction at some stage Two classes of...

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Ch. 3 - 1 1. Reactions and Their Mechanisms Almost all organic reactions fall into one of four categories: Substitutions Additions Eliminations Rearrangements
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Ch. 3 - 2 Substitutions Characteristic reactions of saturated compounds such as alkanes and alkyl halides and of aromatic compounds (even though they are unsaturated) In a substitution, one group replaces another
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Ch. 3 - 3 Additions Characteristic of compounds with multiple bonds In an addition reaction all parts of the adding reagent appear in the product; two molecules become one
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Ch. 3 - 4 Eliminations In an elimination one molecule loses the elements of another small molecule Elimination reactions give us a method for preparing compounds with double and triple bonds
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Ch. 3 - 5 Rearrangements In a rearrangement a molecule undergoes a reorganization of its constituent parts
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Ch. 3 - 6 2. Acid–Base Reactions Many of the reactions that occur in organic chemistry are either acid–base reactions themselves or they involve an
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Unformatted text preview: acidbase reaction at some stage Two classes of acidbase reactions are fundamental in organic chemistry BrnstedLowry Lewis acidbase reactions Ch. 3 - 7 2A. 2A. Br Br nsted nsted Lowry Acids and Bases Lowry Acids and Bases BrnstedLowry acidbase reactions involve the transfer of protons A BrnstedLowry acid is a substance that can donate (or lose) a proton A BrnstedLowry base is a substance that can accept (or remove) a proton Ch. 3 - 8 2B. 2B. Acids and Bases in Water Acids and Bases in Water Hydronium ion (H 3 O + ) is the strongest acid that can exist in water to any significant extent Hydroxide ion (HO-) is the strongest base that can exist in water to any significant extent Ch. 3 - 9 3. Lewis Acids and Bases Lewis Acids are electron pair acceptors Lewis Bases are electron pair donors 3 Lewis Acid (e pair acceptor) Lewis Base (e pair donor)...
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This note was uploaded on 02/20/2012 for the course CHEM 333 taught by Professor Lavigne during the Fall '09 term at South Carolina.

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Lect7_0902 - acidbase reaction at some stage Two classes of...

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