{[ promptMessage ]}

Bookmark it

{[ promptMessage ]}

DevelopmentOfEnglishConstitutionalMonarchy

DevelopmentOfEnglishConstitutionalMonarchy - English...

Info icon This preview shows pages 1–14. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ms. Susan M. Pojer Ms. Susan M. Pojer Horace Greeley H. S.      Chappaqua, NY Horace Greeley H. S.      Chappaqua, NY Ms. Susan M. Pojer Horace Greeley H. S.      Chappaqua, NY Horace Greeley H. S.      Chappaqua, NY English English Constitutional Constitutional Monarchy Monarchy
Image of page 1

Info icon This preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Background (1215-1603) Background (1215-1603)
Image of page 2
              Magna Carta, 1215 a King John I forced to accept it. a A list of demands made by the nobility. a Created a CONTRACT between the king and the  aristocracy. a Established principles which limited the power of  the king: Established basic legal rights. The king must ask for popular consent for taxes. Accused must have jury trial.
Image of page 3

Info icon This preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Model Parliament, 1295 a King Edward I brought his military  leaders and nobility together as a  Parliament to ask their consent to new  taxes. a Established the principle of  parliamentary  “power of the purse.”  a A radical new idea for any monarch to  ask for anything!
Image of page 4
The Elizabethan “Bargain” a Parliament: Would have the power to tax. Can debate and amend disputed  bills. a The Monarch: Had the royal  perogative  [right/choice]  on foreign  policy.
Image of page 5

Info icon This preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
The Early Stuarts (1603-1649) The Early Stuarts (1603-1649)
Image of page 6
The Stuart Monarchy
Image of page 7

Info icon This preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
James I  [r. 1603-1625] James I’s speech to the House of  Commons: I am surprised that my ancestors  should ever be permitted such an  institution to come into existence.  I  am a stranger, and found it here  when I arrived, so that I am obliged  to put up with what I cannot get  rid of!
Image of page 8
James I  [r. 1603-1625] a Wanted absolute power. a He quickly alienated a Parliament  grown accustomed under the Tudors  to act on the premise that monarch  and Parliament TOGETHER ruled  England as a  “balance polity.”
Image of page 9

Info icon This preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
James I  [r. 1603-1625] a He alienated the Puritans by his  strong defense of the Anglican  Church. a Many of England’s gentry [mostly  rich landowners below the level of the  nobility] became Puritans. These Puritan gentry formed an  important and large part of the  House of Commons. It was NOT WISE to alienate  them!
Image of page 10
Gunpowder Plot, 1605 a An attempt by some provincial Catholics to  kill King James I and most of the Protestant  aristocracy. a Blow up the House of Lords during the state  opening of Parliament. Guy Fawkes
Image of page 11

Info icon This preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Executions of the Gunpowder Plotters
Image of page 12
James I  [r. 1603-1625] a Problems he faced: Large royal debt. He wasn’t English   he didn’t  understand English customs [esp.  English law!] Believed in Divine Right of Kings.
Image of page 13

Info icon This preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Image of page 14
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

{[ snackBarMessage ]}

What students are saying

  • Left Quote Icon

    As a current student on this bumpy collegiate pathway, I stumbled upon Course Hero, where I can find study resources for nearly all my courses, get online help from tutors 24/7, and even share my old projects, papers, and lecture notes with other students.

    Student Picture

    Kiran Temple University Fox School of Business ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    I cannot even describe how much Course Hero helped me this summer. It’s truly become something I can always rely on and help me. In the end, I was not only able to survive summer classes, but I was able to thrive thanks to Course Hero.

    Student Picture

    Dana University of Pennsylvania ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    The ability to access any university’s resources through Course Hero proved invaluable in my case. I was behind on Tulane coursework and actually used UCLA’s materials to help me move forward and get everything together on time.

    Student Picture

    Jill Tulane University ‘16, Course Hero Intern