Federalist Era 1789-1801

Federalist Era 1789-1801 - The Federalist Era 1789-1801...

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The Federalist Era 1789-1801 Chapter 10: Launching the New Ship of State
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The Big Picture Questions What di d t he ci t i zens of t he ear l y r epubl i c hope f or ? What di d t hey f ear ? How di d t hey seek t o bal ance f r eedom and or der ?
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Themes of Chapter 10 Led by Washington and Hamilton, the first administration under the Constitution overcame various difficulties and firmly established the political and economic foundations of the new federal gov’t. The first Congress under the Constitution, led by James Madison, also contributed to the new republic by adding The Bill of Rights Between 1789 and 1820, conflict over the increasing power of the nat’l gov’t created intensified, sectional tension.
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Themes of Chapter 10 The cabinet debate over Hamilton’s financial measure expanded into a wider political conflict between Hamiltonian Federalists and Jeffersonian Republicans - the first political parties in America. Federalists supported a strong central gov’t, a “loose” interpretation of the Constitution, and commerce (business.) (Democratic) Republicans supported states’ rights, a “strict” interpretation of the Constitution and agriculture (farmers) Between 1789 and 1820, conflict over the increasing power of the nat’l gov’t created intensified, sectional tension.
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Themes of Chapter 10 The French Revolution created as severe ideological and political division over foreign policy between Federalist and Republicans. The foreign-policy crisis coincided with domestic political divisions that culminated in the bitter election of 1800, but in the end power passed peacefully from Federalists to Republicans. American isolationist tradition emerges as a result of Washington’s strong neutrality stance and his farewell warnings about foreign alliances. Between 1789 and 1820, conflict over the increasing power of the nat’l gov’t created intensified, sectional tension.
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How Will This New Gov’t Last? It was a commonly held view that factionalism would eventually destroy a republican gov’t extended over such a large territory. What prevents this possible gov’t destruction?
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How Will This New Gov’t Last? G. Washington - central symbol of republican gov’t and virtue Heroism Integrity Nonpartisanship Reluctance to hold power http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/a/af/George_Washington_Museum _statue.jpg/450px-George_Washington_Museum_statue.jpg
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How Will This New Gov’t Last? America 1790 Rural - 90% Very few large towns Finances precarious Public debt enormous Worthless paper money, both state and nat’l, in heavy circulation Foreign challenges by Britain and Spain threaten unity http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/a/af/George_Washington_Museum _statue.jpg/450px-George_Washington_Museum_statue.jpg
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How Will This New Gov’t Last? G. Washington’s precedent:
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This note was uploaded on 02/17/2012 for the course HISTORY 102 taught by Professor Rotunda during the Fall '10 term at Rutgers.

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Federalist Era 1789-1801 - The Federalist Era 1789-1801...

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