Overview_of_Thrombosis

Overview_of_Thrombosis - Overview of Thrombosis There are 3...

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Overview of Thrombosis There are 3 primary influences on the formation of a thrombus: 1) endothelial injury; 2) altered blood flow (stasis and turbulence); and 3) hypercoagulability. Endothelial injury is especially relevant to the development of a thrombus in the arterial system. The exposure of the endothelial matrix to platelets in the blood results in platelet release of many procoagulant factors (ADP, fibrinogen, calcium, Factors V and VIII) that activate the extrinsic and intrinsic clotting cascades. Endothelial dysfunction favors a prothrombotic versus an anticoagulant environment in the blood. Conditions that produce endothelial dysfunction are: hypertension, turbulent blood flow as found in atherosclerotic vessels, bacterial endotoxin, cigarette toxins, hypercholesterolemia and homocystinemia. Stasis and turbulence are two types of altered blood flow. Both disrupt the normal laminar flow of blood, and permit platelets to contact the vessel wall. This activates the endothelium to synthesize a greater proportion of prothrombotic factors than
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Overview_of_Thrombosis - Overview of Thrombosis There are 3...

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