LIU1WBCs.docx - Learning Issue: White Blood Cells Name:...

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Learning Issue: White Blood Cells Name: Nicole Wood White blood cells (WBCs), or leukocytes, are part of the immune system and help the body to fight infection. They circulate in the blood so that they can be transported to an area where an infection has developed. In a normal adult body there are 4,000 to 11,000 (average 7,000) WBCs per microliter of blood. When the number of WBCs in the blood increases, this is a sign of an infection somewhere in the body. A healthy child and a healthy full-grown adult will have WBC counts that are very similar. Five main types of WBCs and the average percentage of each type in the blood: Neutrophils - 58 percent Eosinophils - 2 percent Basophils - 1 percent Monocytes - 4 percent Lymphocytes - 4 percent Neutrophils, eosinophils, basophils and monocytes are formed in the bone marrow. Neutrophils, eosinophils and basophils are also called granulocytes because they have granules in their cells that contain digestive enzymes. Neutrophils
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This note was uploaded on 02/18/2012 for the course PAS 600 - 601 taught by Professor Garrubba during the Fall '10 term at Chatham University.

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LIU1WBCs.docx - Learning Issue: White Blood Cells Name:...

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