Bellspalsy.doc - Learning Issue: Bells palsy Bells palsy is...

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Learning Issue: Bells palsy Bell’s palsy is an idiopathic, isolated, usually unilateral facial weakness in the distribution of the seventh cranial nerve (<1% are bilateral). Cause of Lesion Proposed causes of Bell's palsy include microcirculatory failure of the vasa nervorum, [8,9] viral infection, ischemic neuropathy, and autoimmune reactions. [10,11] Of these, the viral hypothesis has been the most widely accepted [4,12] ; however, no virus has ever been consistently isolated from the serum of patients with Bell's palsy. [13] Thus, the evidence for the viral hypothesis is indirect, relying on clinical observations and changes in viral antibody titers. Furthermore, although the underlying cause may be viral, the immediate cause of the paralysis itself is debated to be viral neuropathy alone or ischemic neuropathy secondary to viral infection. [14] Acute facial paralysis can occur as part of many viral illnesses, including mumps, [15] rubella, [16] herpes simplex , [17] and Epstein-Barr virus. [18,19]
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This note was uploaded on 02/18/2012 for the course PAS 600 - 601 taught by Professor Garrubba during the Fall '10 term at Chatham University.

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Bellspalsy.doc - Learning Issue: Bells palsy Bells palsy is...

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