CHAPTER 11

CHAPTER 11 - CHAPTER 11: HABITAT MANAGEMENT Habitat...

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CHAPTER 11: HABITAT MANAGEMENT Habitat management refers to the scientific manipulation of food, water, cover, space, populations and relationships to provide better essential living conditions for wildlife. A) Climatic considerations : 1) Habitat mgmt. - possibilities limited by the constraints of climate, e.g. moisture gradient categories: a. Hydroseral wildlife, adapted to wetlands b. Mesoseral wildlife, adapted to moderate moisture c. Xeroseral wildlife, adapted to deserts 2) Plant succession (natural or induced) and availability of water, most common important natural changes, e.g. common categories: a. Low-successional wildlife, e.g. includes species dependent on annual grasses and forbs as well as annual agricultural crops b. Mid-succession wildlife, includes species associated with succession induced by disturbances such as fire, logging, livestock grazing as well as other factors c. Climax wildlife, includes many threatened and endangered species. Why? B) General objectives of wildlife habitat management --purpose to provide a balanced framework for prescriptions of habitat management 1) Retain existent beneficial habitat factors:
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* Example, retain food, cover, water and even mortality factors. Ecological hotspots are important, e.g. mineral licks, lambing areas, headquarters areas for bobwhite quail and etc. 2) Add or replace missing but essential habitat factors: * Example, mule deer winter range * Example, Strutting grounds (leks) of sage grouse 3) Remove existent harmful factors within the habitat. * Example, the restricted use of DDT may have
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This note was uploaded on 02/18/2012 for the course BIO 260 taught by Professor Dannyraymer during the Fall '11 term at BYU.

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CHAPTER 11 - CHAPTER 11: HABITAT MANAGEMENT Habitat...

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