Syllabus_Chapter16

Syllabus_Chapter16 - Biological Science: Principles and...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–5. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Biological Science: Principles and Reasoning Honors 260 (sec. 002) Syllabus Chapters 16 Fall 2011 Instructor: Danny L Raymer 275 WIDB 602-0944
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
2
Background image of page 2
CHAPTER 16: WILDLIFE AND WATER Wildlife and water: Water is indispensable to all organisms and yet is unevenly distributed -- in time and space -- across the earth's surface. Global use of fresh water (only from rivers, lakes and groundwater) by man for agriculture, industry and municipalities has more than tripled since 1950 and this amounts to 30% of the world's stable renewable supply. Even though the earth is covered 76% by water, 97% of that amount is salt water. Very little of the 3% is available. A) Properties of water: 1) High heat capacity: This is one of the more important properties of water in relation to living organisms. These properties help to stabilize body temperatures of both homeotherm and poikilotherm organisms. 2) Water, the 'universal solvent': Water dissolves, suspends and transports the elements and nutrient required to support life. Water dissolves salts and may form acids in soil and rock and thus is the major agent of erosion. We widely use water to dissolve or disperse pollutants (for better or worse). B) Ecological influences of water: 1) Light penetration and life: Wave action and turbidity decrease light penetration depth and have a negative relationship with submerged vegetation. Carp and other bottom feeding fish contribute to turbidity; this is bad for waterfowl marshes. 2) Topography and its relationship to water and its actions: a. Topography of the land, climatic variables, soil and rock parent material -- and man's actions -- contributes to soil erosion. Consider the tons of soil from erosion carried by these major rivers per year: 3
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
1. Yellow River, 2080 million tons 2. Ganges River, 1600 million tons 3. Amazon River, 400 million tons 4. Mississippi River, 344 million tons 5. Colorado River, 149 million tons Antarctic glaciers discharge into the ocean, 35 to 50 billion tons of sediment annually. This is one of the reasons for the biotic richness of the Antarctic Ocean. b. Topography and erosion create various wildlife habitats. 1. Oxbow lakes, billabongs, rapids and canyons 2. Deltas 3. Topography affects weather patterns 4. Mountain snowpacks and watershed characteristics are important to wildlife. C)
Background image of page 4
Image of page 5
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

This note was uploaded on 02/18/2012 for the course BIO 260 taught by Professor Dannyraymer during the Fall '11 term at BYU.

Page1 / 9

Syllabus_Chapter16 - Biological Science: Principles and...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 5. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online