ChineseClassicalNovels

ChineseClassicalNovels - AReviewonChinese ClassicalNovels...

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A Review on Chinese  Classical Novels 22.11.2007
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Outline 1.  Romance of the Three Kingdom 三三三三 2.  Water Margin 三三三 3.  Journey to the West 三三三 4.  Dream of the Red Chamber 三三三 5.  The Jing Ping Mei 三三三
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Romance of the Three Kingdom   Roman of the Three Kingdom  ( Sanguo zhi yanyi) Water Margin  ( Shuihu zhuan ): China’s earliest  novels, in the sense of long stories, at least partly  fictional, written in contemporary vernacular and  divided into chapters. Both are generally thought to be date from the 2 nd  half  of the 14 th  century. No information on these works appears in surviving  15 th  century sources, and the oldest print edition we  have are from the 16 th  century.
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Romance of the Three Kingdom   The subject matter of these novels is  traceable to popular story cycles known  to have been used by professional  storytellers at least as early as the Song  Dynasty.
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1.  Romance of the Three  Kingdom The authorship is attributed to Luo  Guanzhong (ca 1330-1440). The novel originally consists of 240 sections,  which were later combined into 120 chapters. The standard version was edited by Mao  Zonggang in 17 th  -18 th  century.  He added an  extensive critical commentary after the  example of Jin Shengtan’s edition of Water  Margin. The first edition of Mao’s version came out in  1680.
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1.  Romance of the Three  Kingdom It tells the  history of the Chinese civil wars  in  the period from 180-280 A.D. After the Yellow Turban Uprising and many  other disturbances, the empire is finally  divided into three regions, each with its  military leader:  Cao Cao  (the state of Wei) in  the North,  Sun Quan  (the state of Wu)   in the  Liu Bei  (the state of Shu-Han) in  Sichuan.
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Romance of the Three  Kingdom In 220-221, these leader and their various  sons and successors set themselves up as  emperor: the Han Dynasty is followed by the  Three Kingdoms of Wei, Wu, and Shu-Han. Unity is not restored until 280 A.D., when the  Jin, the successor to the Wei, which had  annexed Shu-Han in 263, succeeds in  conquering Wu.
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Romance of the Three  Kingdom Despite the title, the emphasis of the book is  not on the Three Kingdom period (220-280)  but  on the era that led up to the tripartition .
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ChineseClassicalNovels - AReviewonChinese ClassicalNovels...

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