Lsn 18 Roman Empire and Medieval Europe

Lsn 18 Roman Empire and Medieval Europe - Part 1: Roman...

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Part 1: Roman Empire Part 2: Medieval Europe Lesson 18
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Part 1: Roman Empire Theme: Republic and Empire Lesson 18
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ID & SIG: Augustus (Octavian), dictators, empire, Julius Caesar, patricians, plebeians, latifundia, pax romana, republic
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Origins of Rome Rome was founded in the 8 th Century B.C. and was originally a small city-state ruled by a single king Late in the 6 th Century B.C., the city’s aristocrats deposed the king, ended the monarchy, and instituted a republic A republic is a form of government in which delegates represent the interests of various constituents The Roman republic survived for over 500 years and at one time dominated the Mediterranean basin
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Mediterranean Basin
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Legend of Rome’s Founding Aeneas migrated from Troy to Italy Two of his descendants, Romulus and Remus, were abandoned by an evil uncle in the flooded Tiber River A kindly she-wolf found them and nursed them to health The boys grew strong and courageous and in 753 B.C., Romulus founded the city of Rome and established himself as its first king Romulus and Remus being nursed by the she-wolf
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Rise of Rome From humble beginnings, Rome grew into a strong commercial center, in part because of its geographic location Rome enjoyed easy access to the Mediterranean via the Tiber River, but because it was not on the coast, it was safe from invasion or attack by the sea By the 6 th Century B.C., trade routes from all parts of Italy converged in Rome
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Establishment of the Republic When the aristocracy deposed the king in 509 and established a republic, they instituted a republican constitution Executive responsibilities were entrusted to two consuls who wielded civil and military power Consuls were elected by an assembly dominated by hereditary aristocrats and wealthy classes Consuls served one year terms
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Establishment of the Republic The Senate was composed mostly of aristocrats with extensive political experience They advised the consuls and ratified all major decisions Roman Senate house
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Patricians versus Plebeians Both the consuls and the Senate represented the interests of the patricians– the hereditary aristocrats and wealthy classes This caused tension between the patricians and the common people– the plebeians In honor of the Roman plebeians, freshmen at West Point are called plebes
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Patricians versus Plebeians In the early 5 th Century, tensions got so bad that the plebeians threatened to secede from Rome and establish a rival settlement In order to maintain the integrity of the Roman state, the patricians granted the plebeians the right to elect officials known as tribunes to represent their interests
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Patricians versus Plebeians Originally the plebeians were authorized two tribunes, but that number eventually rose to ten Tribunes had the power to intervene in all political matters and to veto measures they thought were unfair Still the patricians continued to dominate Rome
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Increased Representation for Plebeians
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Lsn 18 Roman Empire and Medieval Europe - Part 1: Roman...

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