RESURGENCE OF EMPIRE IN EAST ASIA

RESURGENCE OF - RESURGENCE OF EMPIRE IN EAST ASIA CHINA UNDER THE SUI TANG AND SONG ANARCHY IN CHINA Three Kingdoms 220-280 Shu Han 221 263 Wei 220

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RESURGENCE OF EMPIRE IN EAST ASIA CHINA UNDER THE SUI, TANG, AND SONG
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ANARCHY IN CHINA Three Kingdoms 220-280 Shu Han 221 – 263 Wei 220 - 265 Most powerful, eventually conquered Shu Built an army of Chinese infantry and nomadic cavalry as mounted bowmen These assimilated nomads later overthrew Wei and founded own dynasties Wu 222 – 280 Jin Dynasty 265-420 Western Jin 265 – 316 and Eastern Jin 317 – 420 Only time during interregnum when China was united Intermixture of nomads and Chinese accelerated Sixteen Kingdoms 304 – 420 Southern and Northern Dynasties 420-589 Southern Dynasties Liu Song 420 – 479 Southern Qi 479 – 502 Liang 502 - 557 Chen 557 ~589 Northern Dynasties Later [Northern] Wei 386 – 534 Eastern Wei 534 -550 Western Wei 535 – 556 Northern Qi 550 – 577 Northern Zhou 557 ~581 Period Resembled Western European history after the collapse of the Romans Disunity and civil war between nomads and Chinese warlords Rival states, dynasties, each controlling a part of the old Han state Aristocrats, provincial nobles held land and real influence Many of the northern dynasties were nomadic, both Turkish and Mongol Confucianism in decline, Buddhism in ascendancy due to its relationship with the nomads Confucian trained bureaucrats still held much influence Common Chinese subject to taxes, warfare, drafting into army, frequent invasions, bandits
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BUDDHISM ARRIVES IN CHINA Foreign religions in China: Nestorian, Muslim, Buddhist merchant communities Oases on the Silk Road were very mixed Became location for foreign settlements, transmission of foreign faiths to China Buddhism in China Attraction: moral standards, intellectual sophistication, salvation, appeal to women, poor Monasteries became large landowners, helped the poor and needy Posed a challenge to Chinese cultural traditions Buddhism and Daoism Chinese monks explained Buddhist concepts in Daoist vocabulary Dharma as dao , and nirvana as wuwei Teaching: one son in monastery would benefit whole family for 10 generations Mahayana Buddhism Buddhism blended with Chinese characteristics Buddha as a man became Buddha as a god, saint Stupa became a pagoda; Buddha became fat or feminine Chan Buddhism A further evolution of Buddhism Chan (or Zen in Japanese) was a popular Buddhist sect Emphasized intuition and sudden flashes of insight
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This note was uploaded on 02/17/2012 for the course HISTORY 210 taught by Professor St. john during the Spring '11 term at Rutgers.

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RESURGENCE OF - RESURGENCE OF EMPIRE IN EAST ASIA CHINA UNDER THE SUI TANG AND SONG ANARCHY IN CHINA Three Kingdoms 220-280 Shu Han 221 263 Wei 220

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