4Constitution

4Constitution - American Government Lecture 4 The...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–10. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
American Government Lecture 4 - The Constitution
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Schedule Lecture 3 Review Lecture 4 - The Constitution
Background image of page 2
Lecture 3 Review 13 Colonies All with different origins, religions and laws Made up of very independent people 5 different types of people All with different economic interests British Rule Not strong rule Mainly concerned with protecting borders Attempts to tax the people fail miserably
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Lecture 3 Review Colonists rebel Decide to seek independence Declaration of Independence Revolutionary War Main complaint is a dislike of distant government Create a loose Confederation Articles of Confederation Weak system of collaboration of States States keep all real power Central government tries to coordinate them
Background image of page 4
Lecture 3 Review Articles Weaknesses No Executive or Judiciary No ability to enforce decisions (especially trade) No ability to mediate disputes (caused by trade) No ability to raise taxes No ability to raise army Shays Rebellion Demonstrates the failure of the Articles Leads to Philadelphia Convention
Background image of page 5

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Philadelphia Convention Intended to reform, not rewrite Articles Delegates realize overhaul is needed Lack the authority to do it Convention proceeds in secret Take 5 months to draft a new document Balancing acts: Union of States vs. Union of People States alone are not defendable against invasion People alone do not view themselves as united Limited government that does no harm vs. Active government that protects the people from harm
Background image of page 6
Disagreement and Compromise Members frequently walked out Vote was by State, not member Few provisions of Constitution were unanimous Convention lacked consensus Disagreement over the power of central government Disagreement over the three branches • Powers • Restrictions • Accountability Two major conflicts Great Compromise Three-Fifths Compromise
Background image of page 7

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Great Compromise Debate over Representation Will government represent the States or their People? Virginia Plan (Edmund Randolph) Two Houses of Representation Based upon population of States and tax revenue Favored by Large States New Jersey Plan (William Patterson) Single House of Representation Equal Representation by State Favored by Small States
Background image of page 8
Great Compromise Nearly Ended the Union “a separation could never happen upon better
Background image of page 9

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Image of page 10
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

Page1 / 28

4Constitution - American Government Lecture 4 The...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 10. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online