Chem 161-2011 Lecture 2, Ch 1

Chem 161-2011 Lecture 2, Ch 1 - CHEMISTRY 161-2011 LECTURE...

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Chem 161-2011 Lecture 2, Chapter 1 1 CHEMISTRY 161-2011 LECTURE 2 ANNOUNCEMENTS E-MAIL Don’t let your mailboxes get full. QUIZ/EXAM/WORKSHEET MISCELLANEOUS Bring copy of notes to class Review notes before coming to class. ATTENDANCE SHEET If you have not received any e-mail from me, then add your name and e-mail address to the blank space or the bottom of the sheet. Please also add your section number.
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Chem 161-2011 Lecture 2, Chapter 1 2 Dr. Ed Tavss Chem 161 edtavss@aol.com TAVSS’ SCHEDULE Pd. Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri 0 1 Chem 161 Office Hours SC-219 8:30-9:30 Secs 50&51 rec. Chem 161 Office Hours SC-219 8:30-9:30 Secs 52&53 rec. 2 Chem 161 Lecture 9:50-11:10 AM, Scott 135 Corresponding recitations: 50-55 Chem 161 Lecture 9:50-11:10 AM, Scott 135 Corresponding recitations: 50-55 3 Sec 55 rec. Secs. 54 rec. Friday, Sep. 23 rd and Tuesday, Sept. 27 th , Rec. quiz I, Chapters 1 - 3 Wednesday, Oct. 5 th , Exam I, 9:40 – 11:00 PM, Chapters 1 – 5.3 Tuesday, Oct. 18 th and Friday, Oct. 21 st , Rec. quiz II, Chapters 6.1 – 7.4 Wednesday, Nov. 2 nd , Exam II, 9:40 – 11:00 PM, Chapters 5.4 - 8.2 Wednesday, Nov. 30 th , Exam III, 9:40 – 11:00 PM, Chapters 8.3 – 10.8 Tuesday, Dec. 6 th and Friday, Dec. 9 th , Recitation quiz III, Chapters 10 - 11 Friday, Dec. 16 th , Final Exam, noon - 3 PM, Chapters cumulative 1.1 – 12.6 ?, Last day to drop course with “W”
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Chem 161-2011 Lecture 2, Chapter 1 3 PLAN FOR TODAY : Chapter 1 Scientific method: includes observation, law, hypothesis, experiment, theory Classification and separation of matter States of matter: solid, liquid, gas Chemical vs. physical change; chemical vs. physical properties Extensive vs. intensive properties SI system Mass vs. weight Atomic mass units (AMU’s) Temperature scales Significant figures Exponential notation (aka “Scientific notation”) Precision vs. accuracy Metric system prefixes Unit conversions Unit conversions using cube concept Unit conversions of fractions
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Chem 161-2011 Lecture 2, Chapter 1 4 THE SCIENTIFIC METHOD Chemistry is a science. What is a science? A systematic method of building on what we know. Observation Law Experiment New Observation Theory (model) A hypothesis is an explanation of an observation; the explanation must be testable. Hypothesis: When CH 4 combusts, it combines with components of air. New experiment: Combust CH 4 in air and analyze products for CO 2 and H 2 O. If universally consistent (i.e., patterns or trends are identified), the observations can be stated as a law. Lavoisier’s Law of Conservation of Mass: “In a chemical reaction, mass is neither created nor destroyed,” equivalent to, “in a chemical reaction, matter is neither created nor destroyed. A theory is a well-developed explanation of experimental observations, e.g., John Dalton’s Atomic Theory. Dalton explained the law of conservation of mass. Matter is composed of atoms, which merely rearrange in chemical changes, and therefore are neither created nor destroyed, and the total amount of mass remains the same.
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Chem 161-2011 Lecture 2, Ch 1 - CHEMISTRY 161-2011 LECTURE...

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