Notes - Modules 23 & 25

Notes - Modules 23 & 25 - Intelligence Cognition...

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Intelligence Cognition and Language Intelligence I. Intelligence Assessment A. Intelligence is the "cognitive ability to learn from experience, to reason well, and to cope with demands of daily living." or as stated by Wechsler "ability to act purposefully, think rationally and to be able to deal effectively with the environment." II. Spearman - Develops a single concept of general intelligence - a "g" factor III. Thurstone - Concept of 7 different mental abilities IV. Cattell - Two clusters of mental ability A. Crystallized Intelligence - reasoning and verbal skills B. Fluid Intelligence - spatial, visual V. Sternberg -- Cognitive components of intelligence - The Triarchic Theory of Intelligence A.Componential Intelligence-learning new information B. Experiential Intelligence - solving specific problems, creative, insight C. Contextual Intelligence - ability to select contexts in which you can excel VI. Gardner's Multiple Intelligences A.Linguistic B. Logical - mathematical C. Musical
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D. Spatial E. Bodily - Kinesthetic F. Interpersonal G. Intrapersonal VII. Heritability of Intelligence A. Tryon's rat experiments suggests some genetic link.(1940's) B. Supported by twin studies C. Suggested 50/50, nature/nurture VIII. The Nature of Psychological Testing A. An objective and standardized sample of behavior. 1. Standardized - implies uniformity in administration & scoring. Standardization is the process of defining meaningful scores on a test by administering it to a large representative sample of people. B. Reliability 1. A measure of consistency, if you take a test and get a score today, will you get the same score tomorrow and next week? 2. Measured with testing correlations, use the split-half and test/re-test methods C. Validity 1. Does the test measure what it says it measures? 2. Does it accurately measure the trait, construct, or content? a. Content Validity - does the test measure what it says it measures, based on content of items or concept of test itself. b. Criterion Validity - checks test against a dependent measure, does it describe and predict?
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D. The Normal Curve - the key to understanding tests and norm groups. Represents a theoretical distribution of scores, larger numbers obtain scores at the middle and there
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This note was uploaded on 02/18/2012 for the course PSY 100 taught by Professor Farthing during the Winter '08 term at University of Maine Orono .

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Notes - Modules 23 & 25 - Intelligence Cognition...

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