African American English Part One

African American English Part One - African American...

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African American English (AAE) LIN 200 Dr. JC Weisenberg
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African American English http://www.youtube.com/watch?v =RTt07IVDeww
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What is African American English? One of the oldest dialects of English found in the US. AAE dates back to the earliest contact between enslaved Africans and Europeans - some four centuries. A social variety or sociolect spoken by a majority of African Americans in the United States. A dialect with its own phonology, grammar, and vocabulary. A rule-governed , systematic language system like all other dialects and language varieties. A culturally transmitted way of communicating.
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AAE: African American English Refers to the full range of standard and non-standard or “vernacular” varieties used (mainly) by people of African American descent in the US. Currently the term preferred by most linguists.
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What’s in a name? BE: Black English (1960s-70s) Ebonics: (Ebony + Phonics) dubbed in 1970s by activist educators; term commonly used by non-linguists. BEV: Black English Vernacular (1960s-70s) BVE: Black Vernacular English (1960s-70s) AAVE: African American Vernacular English (1980s) AAE: African American English (Late 1990s) BL: Black Language (21 st Century; Alim 2005)
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Black Language (BL) Used by hip hop linguist Samy Alim in his book “You Know my Steez” (2005). “Steez , in particular, though, has a broader application that means something closer to ‘a mode of being in one’s everydayness’. Yo steez not only refers to how you talk or how you walk, but more generally, it’s how you do yo thang, how you let it hang—how you let it swang. It’s what others come to expect from you, cuz that’s just who you be. By being heavily involved in the lives of the Sunnyside youth, I have attempted not only to capture they speech style, but they steez, who they bees.” (2005:5)
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Linguistic Profiling http://www.youtube.com/watch?v =3KCL97s1lJg&feature=related
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Language Discrimination According to Baugh (2000), “linguistic profiling is based upon auditory cues that may be used to identify an individual or individuals as belonging to a linguistic subgroup within a given speech community, including a racial subgroup” (363).
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Purnell et al (1999) show that people can judge a speaker’s race on the basis of speech with accuracy rates of 81-97%. The study presents the findings of four experiments. In one experiment the authors show that dialect identification is possible on the basis of the word hello alone. Language Discrimination
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Housing discrimination In another experiment conducted by Baugh, a telephone survey was conducted (N = 989 calls) using standard and nonstandard dialects to inquire about housing from the same landlords in the Bay Area. The results show that landlords routinely discriminate against prospective tenants on the basis of the sound of their voice on the phone.
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Ax or Ask ? http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=
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African American English Part One - African American...

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