Native American Languages Part 1

Native American Languages Part 1 - Native American...

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Native American Languages Part I Stony Brook University Language in the US Dr. Weisenberg
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Language Families A language family is a group of languages related by descent from a common ancestor, called the proto- language of that family.
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Language Family
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What are the major Native American language families? The most widely accepted classification of Native American languages in the US is that made by Edward Sapir in 1929. Sapir arranged the numerous linguistic groups in five major unrelated linguistic stocks, or families.
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Five Major Native American Language Families 1. Eskimo-Aleut (Alaska) (“a-lay-oot ”) 2. Algonquian-Wakashan (North Central, Northeast) 3. Nadene, Penutian (West Coast) (“na- de nay”) 4. Hokan-Siouan (North Central) (“soo-in”) 5. Aztec-Tanoan (Southwest US, New Mexico) (“ton-i-wan”)
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Native American Languages in US and Canada at the time of European Contact Somewhere between 250 and 600 175 spoken in the USA (circa 1997) 20 languages being learned by children; 55 spoken only by oldest people, usually 10 or less. Over 70% (ca. 150) are in extreme danger of language death or extinction. In recent years?
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Native American Tribes in New York State Mohawk Oneida Seneca Cayuga Mohegan Onandaga Map of NYS tribes. http://www.ethnologue.com/show_map.asp?name=USA&seq=5
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Native Americans in New York State Oneida Indian Nation The Oneida Indian Nation, one of the original members of the Iroquois Confederacy, enjoys a unique role in America's history having supported the Colonies in the struggle for independence from England. The Nation exists as a sovereign political unit which predates the Constitution of the United
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Original 13 Tribes of Native American on Long Island Montauk Cutchogue Nissequogue Mastic Merrick Unkechaug Patchogue Rockaway Jamaica Setauket Manhanset Metinecock Shinnecock
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Shinnecock in Eastern Long Island (Southampton) State Recognized for over 200years. Applied for Federal recognition in 1978. Tentative Federal recognition granted in early 2010 (Final recognition anticipated Spring 2010) 1300 members today, 600 of which reside in Eastern Long Island *(possibly reduced to 1,066 in a recent census of 2009) No one has spoken Shinnecock for nearly 200 years, though some words, prayers, and other ceremonial terms have been preserved. The Shinnecock hold inner tribal 4 day pow-wow each year inviting other tribes and visitors from across the country. It is a celebration of dancing during Labor Day including beaded dresses, shawl dances and grass dances. On Wednesday evening hold meetings with traditional meals, dancing and singing (also a Youth Group) They are a matrilineal tribe – membership is inherited from the mother & maternal ancestors Tribal council of 13 – mostly female elder dominated
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Shinnecock Nation – “people of the stony shore” Hakame – word used as a greeting in the Shinnecock language. The Algonquian name for Long Island is “place of shells”. Mamo waweemi ‘We move together.’ tabutney ‘Thank you.’ Shinnecock is part of the Algonquian language family.
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This note was uploaded on 02/15/2012 for the course GERM 200 taught by Professor Kuhmar during the Spring '10 term at SUNY Albany.

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Native American Languages Part 1 - Native American...

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