Orthographics II

Orthographics II - 1 CG 164 Introduction to Graphics for...

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Unformatted text preview: 1 CG 164 Introduction to Graphics for Construction • Today’s Topics –Review of Orthographic Characteristics –Principle Views of Orthographic –How to Draw Orthographics from Isometric- examples shown –Quiz Multiview Drawing- Key Points 1. Most drawings produced and used in industry- both manufacturing and Construction are multiview drawings. 2. Multiview drawings are used to provide accurate three-dimensional object information on two dimensional media, a means of communicating all of the information necessary to transform an idea or concept into reality. 3. The standards and conventions of multiview drawings have been developed over many years, which equip us with a universally understood method of communication. 4. They require several orthographic projections to define the shape of a three- dimensional object. 5. Each orthographic view is a two-dimensional drawing showing only two of the three dimensions of the three-dimensional object. 6. Consequently, no individual view contains sufficient information to completely define the shape of the three-dimensional object. 7. All orthographic views must be looked at together to comprehend the shape of the three-dimensional object. Basic Principle of Projection • To better understand the theory of projection, one must become familiar with the elements that are common to the principles of projection. • First of all, the POINT OF SIGHT (aka STATION POINT) is the position of the observer in relation to the object and the plane of projection. It is from this point that the view of the object is taken. • Secondly, the observer views the features of the object through an imaginary PLANE OF PROJECTION (or IMAGE PLANE). • Imagine yourself standing in front of a glass window, IMAGE PLANE, looking outward; the image of a house at a distance is sketched on to the glass and is a 2D view of a 3D house. 2 Orthographic Projection • The lines connecting from the Point of Sight to the 3D object are called the...
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This note was uploaded on 02/19/2012 for the course CGT 101 taught by Professor Mohler,j during the Fall '08 term at Purdue.

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Orthographics II - 1 CG 164 Introduction to Graphics for...

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