Group 20c - Chimera A Hybrid Pipeline for Film and Broadcast

Group 20c - Chimera A Hybrid Pipeline for Film and...

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Chimera: A Hybrid Pipeline for Film and Broadcast Animation Production Justin Blignaut Dept. Computer Graphics Technology Purdue University jblignau@purdue.edu Bryce Hyland Dept. Computer Graphics Technology Purdue University bhyland@purdue.edu Kurt Luther Dept. Computer Graphics Technology Purdue University lutherk@purdue.edu Kevin O’Keefe Dept. Computer Graphics Technology Purdue University kokeefe@purdue.edu December 14, 2005
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Chimera: A Hybrid Pipeline for Film and Broadcast Animation Production Justin Blignaut Dept. Computer Graphics Technology Purdue University jblignau@purdue.edu Bryce Hyland Dept. Computer Graphics Technology Purdue University bhyland@purdue.edu Kurt Luther Dept. Computer Graphics Technology Purdue University lutherk@purdue.edu Kevin O’Keefe Dept. Computer Graphics Technology Purdue University kokeefe@purdue.edu Abstract Small production houses in the film and broadcast animation industry lack the resources to render complex 3D scenes which require massive data sets. Consequently, time and money is wasted on hodgepodge techniques that look less convincing. Chimera, a hybrid animation production pipeline, combines normal mapping and level of detail to dras- tically improve run-time rendering performance while maintaining perceived visual quality. As a result, small produc- tion houses can render animations that look more detailed using software and hardware they already own. 1. Introduction There is a tremendous need for the develop- ment of a production process to manage and render extremely large data sets (Cohen, 2005). While research-oriented visualization science has produced techniques and procedures for manipu- lating and rendering huge quantities of data, the migration of this technology to practitio ners‘ tool sets has been slow or nonexistent. For example, radiosity was invented in 1984 at Cornell Univer- sity (Coral, Torrance, & Greenberg, 1984) and saw widespread use in the scientific visualization field by the late 1980s, but did not appear in commercial animation packages until a decade later. The same pattern can be repeatedly ob- served with computer graphics techniques such as subdivision surfaces, UV mapping, and so on. With respect to the development of novel render- ing techniques, this lag time between research in academia and implementation in industry represents a discrepancy with potentially signifi- cant economic consequences. An important example of this discrepancy exists between the data management and render- ing techniques used for film and broadcast ani- mation, and real-time interactive 3D techniques used to render massive data sets. When produc- ing animations for film and broadcast, it is com- mon practice to render animations in layers (such as background and foreground elements, specular and diffuse maps, etc.) and composite them to create the final frames; all of the elements seen on a final frame are not rendered simultaneously. One purpose of this technique is to reduce the
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This note was uploaded on 02/19/2012 for the course CGT 411 taught by Professor Staff during the Spring '08 term at Purdue University-West Lafayette.

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Group 20c - Chimera A Hybrid Pipeline for Film and...

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