Lecture 4 September 20

Lecture 4 September 20 - Today in Comparative Politics...

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Today in Comparative Politics Theories of the state What is a state? Why do we need them? How did we get them? Contractarian v. predatory theories Nash equilibrium
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First map quiz Wednesday Be here on time, ready to start quiz right away Covers geography of Western Europe Notes and books closed Electronic devices off and stowed Pencil or pen only on your desk
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Recall the Exit, Voice, and Loyalty game from last time. What can we infer when we see states ignoring the demands of their citizens? For example, if we know that the average North Korean citizen stays in North Korea and is badly treated by the government, and we also see the North Korean leader Kim Jong-Il ignoring his citizens, then we can infer A. That the citizens have no exit threat and that the state (Kim Jong-Il) depends on the citizens. B. That the citizens do have a credible exit threat and that the state depends on the citizens. C. That the citizens do have a credible exit threat and that the state is autonomous. D. We can’t assume anything about whether the state is autonomous but we can assume that the citizens have no credible exit threat.
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Backward-induction equilibria: summary Exit is unattractive Exit is attractive State is autonomous State is dependent Case 4 E < 0; L < 1 (Loyalty, Loyalty), Ignore Case 3 E > 0; L < 1 (Exit, Exit), Ignore Case 2 E < 0; L > 1 (Loyalty, Loyalty), Ignore Case 1 E > 0; L > 1 (Voice, Exit), Respond Citizen’s action depends on expected response by the state. The state’s response depends on expected reply by the citizen.
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What Is the State? A human community that (successfully) claims the monopoly of the legitimate use of physical force within a given territory Max Weber An organization with a comparative advantage in violence , extending over a geographic area whose boundaries are determined by its power to tax constituents Douglass North A relatively centralized, differentiated organizations, the officials of which, more or less, successfully claim control over the chief concentrated means of violence within a population inhabiting a large, contiguous territory Charles Tilly
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Lecture 4 September 20 - Today in Comparative Politics...

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