Mathematical induction

Mathematical induction - 1 1.1 Mathematical induction A...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–2. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
1 Mathematical induction 1.1 A conjecture about Sums of odd numbers Let’s recall that the i-th Odd number is given by the expression 2i-1. So we can make a table whose columns are labeled by i , and show the odd nu mbers and their sums. I 1 2 3 4 5 6 Odd number 1 3 5 7 9 Running sum 1 4 9 16 25 We notice that the running sums (that is, adding the next odd number to the previous sum) seem to always give us a perfect square. In fact, looking more closely, it seems to give us exactly the square of the number i, that is used to calculate the i-th odd number. This might lead us to conjecture that there is an underlying rule that is always true. We have to do a couple of things now. First, we have to figure out how to state that rule mathematically. Second, we have to see how a mathematician would go about proving the rule. We can not say that it would be checked for every value of i, because that would take an infinite amount of time, and this course ends in May. So, first to express this mathematically. We need an expression for the sum of the first “i” odd numbers. But since we are also using “i” in the formula for the odd numbers, we are going to have to use another letter “n” to indicate how many odd numbers we are adding up. We were happy to discover that everyone in the class has seen the use of the capital Greek letter Sigma to represent a sum [although sum of us may have forgotten exactly what it means.] The expression for the sum of the first “N” odd numbers is given by: 1 ( ) (2 1) iN i Sum N i  Note that the N appears only once on the right hand side, as the value of the “upper limit”. We can pronounce this expression as: “The sum, from i=1 to i=N, of the quantity (2i-1).”. In this expression the “i=1” is called the “lower limit”. The “i=N” is called the upper limit; and the “(2i-1)” is called the
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Image of page 2
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

Page1 / 4

Mathematical induction - 1 1.1 Mathematical induction A...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 2. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online