{[ promptMessage ]}

Bookmark it

{[ promptMessage ]}

ReviewForEx_1.2011.Spring-v2

ReviewForEx_1.2011.Spring-v2 - Review for Exam 1 ITI 111...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–4. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Review for Exam 1. ITI 111. Spring 2011 In questions 1 3, we run an experiment consisting of one toss of a 4-sided (tetrahedral) die, whose faces are labeled 1, 2, 3, and 4. 1. A possible outcome of this experiment is (select all that apply): a. 2 b. {2} c. {1,2,3,4} d. 25% 2. The probability of rolling a 4 is (select all that apply): a. 25% b. 1:4 c. 1/3 d. ¼ 3. And finally, in this case, {2,3,1,4} is (select all that apply): 4. Now assume we run an experiment in which we toss a 4-sided die twice. In this case, the result {one 2 and one 4} is (select all that apply): In these next questions, we run an experiment picking a card at random for a deck, noting its color (which we denote as R for red and B for black). And putting that card back, and then randomly picking another card from the deck. So we could get the same card twice. For example: BR means ―first a black card and then a red card‖ 5. The sample space for this experiment is:
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
6. If the deck is a usual one, what is the probability of the event ―At least o ne of the cards was RED‖? a. 25% b. 50% c. 66% d. 75% e. Can’t tell. 8. What is the probability of ―first red, and then black‖ 9. An outcome that can be decomposed into several distinguishable outcomes, such as "choosing an even card from a deck‖, is: 10 . And what about ―pulling the ace of hearts from a deck of cards?‖ a. elementary outcome b. compound outcome c. exclusive outcomes d. independent outcomes e. sample space f. None of the above 11 . The outcomes ―it rains in Beijing‖ and ―President McCormick gives a speech‖ are together an example of: 12 . The outcomes ―The visibility is poor and the winds are high‖ and ―some trees get blown down today‖ are together an example of :
Background image of page 2
a. elementary outcomes b. compound outcomes c. exclusive outcomes d. independent outcomes e. sample space f. not independent outcomes Conditional Probability and Bayes Theorem
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Image of page 4
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

{[ snackBarMessage ]}