Planning and Implementing a Network

Planning and Implementing a Network - Planning and...

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Planning and Implementing a Network Unit1 Discussion Board Kregg M. Soltow July 18, 2011 American Intercontinental University When the first networks hit the scene, speed and performance were always sub par because all the network stations were on the same domain causing collisions. Basically this mean that if you have two network stations and say the first station was currently sending information, and in comes this second station that wants to start transmitting data before the first station completes it’s own, there would then be a collision. In this instance the collision would mean that neither of the stations would get to successfully complete sending their information, and in turn they would both have to wait before trying to send the information again. In other words, all the stations on this network would be on the same “collision domain” because no matter whenever more then one location would attempt to send data a collision would occur.(Lammle,2004) Within collision domains there are no hierarchy’s, all stations are apart of the same two dimensional topology. Now, income the arrival of switched networks. In this instance a switch would be present
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This note was uploaded on 02/17/2012 for the course ITCO 101 taught by Professor Gugenhiem during the Spring '12 term at AIU Online.

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Planning and Implementing a Network - Planning and...

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