Davison2001 - International Journal of Behavioral...

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http://jbd.sagepub.com Development International Journal of Behavioral DOI: 10.1080/016502501316934842 2001; 25; 416 International Journal of Behavioral Development Kirsten Krahnstöver Davison and Elizabeth J. Susman Are hormone levels and cognitive ability related during early adolescence? http://jbd.sagepub.com/cgi/content/abstract/25/5/416 The online version of this article can be found at: Published by: http://www.sagepublications.com On behalf of: International Society for the Study of Behavioral Development can be found at: International Journal of Behavioral Development Additional services and information for http://jbd.sagepub.com/cgi/alerts Email Alerts: http://jbd.sagepub.com/subscriptions Subscriptions: http://www.sagepub.com/journalsReprints.nav Reprints: http://www.sagepub.co.uk/journalsPermissions.nav Permissions: http://jbd.sagepub.com/cgi/content/refs/25/5/416 Citations at Ebsco Electronic Journals Service (EJS) on January 6, 2010 http://jbd.sagepub.com Downloaded from
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http://www.tandf.co.uk/journals/pp/01650254.html DOI: 10.1080/01650250042000375 Are hormone levels and cognitive ability related during early adolescence? Kirsten Krahnsto ¨ver Davison and Elizabeth J. Susman The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA, USA The present study assessed the longstanding question of whether there is a relationship between sex hormones and cognitive ability in young adolescent girls and boys. Three ‘‘theories’’ of the relationship between hormone levels and cognition were identi ed from a broad literature base and were used to formulate hypotheses regarding the relationship between sex hormones and cognitive ability in early adolescents. Fifty-six boys, aged 10–14, and 52 girls, aged 9–14, completed two standardised spatial ability tests and one standardised test of verbal ability. Three blood samples, at 20-minute intervals, were obtained to determine levels of estradiol and testosterone. Data were collected on three occasions for all measures at 6-month intervals. A positive linear relationship between testosterone and spatial ability was identi ed for boys at each time of measurement for both measures of spatial ability (i.e., mental rotation and block design). For girls, a positive linear relationship was identi ed between testosterone and mental rotation only at time 3. In addition, longitudinal relationships were identi ed between change in testosterone levels and change in spatial ability for both girls and boys. The conclusion was that testosterone is related to cognitive functioning during pubertal development for boys and to a lesser extent for girls. Biological changes during adolescence are one of the de ning features of adolescent development. Yet, there is a notable absence of research directed toward these biological changes and how they interact with the broader range of changes associated with adolescence such as social, emotional, and cognitive development. The goal of the present study is to examine the relationship between hormone levels and cognitive
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This note was uploaded on 02/21/2012 for the course PYSC 521 taught by Professor Dr.zarrett during the Spring '11 term at South Carolina.

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Davison2001 - International Journal of Behavioral...

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