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Annotation 1 - Wharton, Matt 1 Simpson, David. The Politics...

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Wharton, Matt 1 Simpson, David. The Politics of American English, 1776-1850 . Oxford University Press. 1986. Professor David Simpson earned his B.A. from Magdalene College in 1973; his M.A. from the University of Michigan in 1974; and his Ph.D. from Magdalene College in 1977. He currently teaches at UC Davis as the G.B. Needham Fellow. He has taught at Columbia, University of Colorado, Northwestern University, and Cambridge. He has published over 8 works, most recently, Situatedness: or Why we Keep Saying Where We're Coming From . Summary: David Simpson’s book, The Politics of American English, 1776- 1850 , describes the changes to the English language pioneered mainly by Noah Webster, and analyzes author James Fenimore Cooper and the ways he uses American-English in his books. The introduction states, “This study is an account of the development of American English between the Declaration of Independence and the middle of the 19 th Century” (Simpson 3). David Simpson’s book, The Politics of American English, 1776- 1850 , describes the changes to the English language made after the Revolutionary War. Connie Eble identifies Noah Webster as “The dominant figure in the establishment of an American idiom” ( Early American Literature – Connie Eble 183). Dr. Simpson addresses the spelling changes to several English words made by Noah Webster.
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Wharton, Matt 2 Virginia McDavid describes, “Some of Webster’s spelling reforms are part of the language today: ‘-or’ instead of ‘-our’ in words like ‘honor’
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Annotation 1 - Wharton, Matt 1 Simpson, David. The Politics...

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