Capillaries - Capillaries Continuous Capillaries Typical...

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Unformatted text preview: Capillaries Continuous Capillaries Typical capillary, found in muscles and skin, nervous system. Continuous because its wall is formed by simple squamous epithelium that form an uninterupted tube. Between endothelial, there are numerous tight junctions which make a semipermeable membrane- however these tight junctions are not continuous, so they actually leave little gaps and are referred to as intercellular clefts or pores. These intercellular clefts are small enough for amino acids, etc to move through but not proteins and stuff to move through. Moving across the capillary wall simple diffusion, fenestrated (small pores), transcytosis (where one end engulfed fluid, the other side exocytosized...) Transcellular. Intercellular clefts (AKA Bulk fluid movement) is another movement paracellular, move between the gaps between cells. Fenestrated Capillary have pores, can allow some small proteins to move across the cell membrane. Restricted distribution... Found in endocrine glands. Allow protein peptide hormones to be carried from interstitial fluid to the blood to be distributed throughout the body. Also interstitial fluid to the blood to be distributed throughout the body....
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Capillaries - Capillaries Continuous Capillaries Typical...

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