{[ promptMessage ]}

Bookmark it

{[ promptMessage ]}

Salivary Glands - Salivary Glands Salivary glands are...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–4. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Salivary Glands:      Salivary glands are compound (branched)  tubuloacinar glands. They are surrounded by a moderately dense  connective tissue from which septa divide the secretory portion of  the gland into lobes and lobules. The secretory unit is the acinus,  which is made up of either serous cells, mucous cells, or both cell  types (mixed acinus). Numerous lymphocytes and plasma cells  populate the CT surrounding the acini in both major and minor  salivary glands. The plasma cells synthesize the antibodies that  are secreted by the salivary glands as secretory immunoglobulin  A. Myoepithelial cells embrace the basal aspect of the acinar  secretory cells move secretory produces toward the excretory  ducts. Role of Saliva:      Moistening dry food, aid in swallowing, dissolving  and suspending food materials that chemically stimulate taste  buds, buffering the contents of the oral cavity with its high  concentration of bicarbonate ion, digestion of carbs by the  digestive enzyme alpha amylase- which breaks there 1-4  glycoside bonds and continues to act in the esophagus and  stomach, and controlling the bacterial flora of the oral cavity  because of the antibacterial enzyme lysozyme. Saliva is also  source of calcium and phosphate ions essential for normal tooth  development and maintenance. It also contains antibodies,  notably salivary sIgA. Salivation is part of a reflex arc that is  normally stimulated by the ingestion of food, although sight, smell,  or even thoughts of food can also stimulate salivation. Submandibular Gland:  Parotid Gland:  Largest of the major salivary glands. Composed 
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
of alveoli containing only serous secretory cells. Adipose tissue  often occurs in the parotid gland and may be a distinguishing  feature. The facial nerve passes through the parotid gland.  Sublingual Gland:  The smallest of the salivary glands. Their  multiple small ducts empty into the submandibular ducts as well  as directly onto the floor of the mouth. IT contains both serous  and mucous elements. The mucous acini predominate. 
Background image of page 2
Esophagus:     This tube has the same basic structural organization through its  length. Its wall is formed by four distinctive layers. From the lumen  outward, they are: -Mucosa:
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Image of page 4
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

{[ snackBarMessage ]}