Lecture5 - Problem The Mars rover"Opportunity needs enough...

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Problem: The Mars rover “Opportunity” needs enough energy to keep its equipment warm throughout the Martian winter without draining Opportunity's batteries. Solution: Park Opportunity tilted towards the south, allowing the solar cells to absorb more energy from the Sun. Opportunity was instructed to climb onto the 15 degree incline of Greeley's Haven.
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Answers to homework #1 must be submitted no later than Thurs. January 26, 5:00 pm.
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Johannes Kepler (1571-1630) Greatest theorist of his day a mystic there were no heavenly spheres forces made the planets move Developed his three laws of planetary motion
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Kepler’s First Law Each planet’s orbit around the Sun is an ellipse, with the Sun at one focus.
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Ellipse: a figure defined by points located such that the sum of the distances from the two foci is constant
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Semimajor axis = a Semiminor axis = b y X x 2 /a 2 + y 2 /b 2 = 1 focus Eccentricity e 2 = 1 - b 2 /a 2
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The circle is a special form of an ellipse
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Kepler’s Second Law A planet moves along its orbit with a speed that changes in such a way that a line from the planet to the Sun sweeps out equal areas in equal intervals of time.
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Consequence - planets move faster when they are closer to the sun and planets spend more time in the more distant parts of their orbits
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Kepler’s Third Law The ratio of the cube of a planet’s average distance from the Sun “a” to the square of its orbital period “P” is the same for each planet. a 3 / P 2 = constant
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Consequence: Planets with larger orbits have longer orbital periods. a 3 / P 2 = constant Earth: a = 1 AU, P = 1 year So, if we use distance in AU and time in years, the constant in the 3rd Law is 1 AU 3 yr -2 Jupiter: a = 5.203 AU, P = 11.86 years
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Kepler's Laws 1. The Law of Orbits : All planets move in elliptical orbits, with the sun at one focus. 2. The
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This note was uploaded on 02/21/2012 for the course AST-A 105 taught by Professor Dr.dash during the Spring '12 term at Indiana.

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Lecture5 - Problem The Mars rover"Opportunity needs enough...

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