FLAT TYRE.docx - FLAT TYRE A flat tire(British English flat...

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FLAT TYRE A flat tire (British English: flat tyre) is a deflated pneumatic tire, which can cause the rim of the wheel to ride on the tire tread or the ground potentially resulting in loss of control of the vehicle or irreparable damage to the tire. The most common cause of a flat tire is puncturing of the tire by a sharp object, such as a nail or pin, letting the air escape. Depending on the size of the puncture, the tire may deflate slowly or rapidly.[1] Contents 1 Other causes 2 Driving or riding with a flat tire 3 Flat tire repair 3.1 Motor vehicles 3.2 Bicycles 4 Dangers of changing a flat tire 5 See also 6 References Other causes Besides puncturing of the tire a flat can be caused by: failure of or damage to the valve stem; rubbing of the tire against the road, ripping the tire, or separation of tire and rim by collision with another object; excessive wear of the tire tread allowing explosive tire failure or allowing road debris to tear through it. Some tires, particularly those with a slow leak, can be repaired and re-inflated; others, especially those with worn tread, must be replaced. Driving or riding with a flat tire
Where a flat tire occurs, drivers are advised to slow gradually and pull off the road.[2] Continuing to drive may damage the wheel, the hub or other parts of the vehicle. Driving with a flat tire, especially at high speeds, may result in a loss of control and an accident. On a bicycle, a flat tire will compromise handling, as well as increasing rolling resistance. Flat tire repair Motor vehicles A UK source reports that flat tires account for about 10% of motor vehicle breakdowns.[3] Motor vehicles are normally equipped for changing a tire. These tools include a jack, a tire iron or lug wrench, and a spare tire. Air pumps run by hand-lever, pressure cans, or electricity can be used to re- inflate slow-leaking tires. One common way to temporarily repair and re-inflate a punctured tire at the roadside is to use a canned tire sealant. The motorist attaches this to the valve, and the compressed propellant inside forces the can's contents through the valve into the tire, a liquid sealant is forced towards the puncture and will seal the puncture. The compressed propellant also inflates the tire. Tire sealant is typically useful on punctures of 3/16in. (5mm) diameter or less. According to research carried out by Continental Tires, 95% of punctures are caused by objects of 5mm or less. Typically, the sealant is a water based latex solution

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